Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline — Aleksey Kondratyev

We are thrilled to be featuring the work of Aleksey Kondratyev as our current Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline artist, through October 27!

Screen Shot 2018-09-08 at 11.26.14 AMIce Fishers
For generations, Kazakh fishers have set out on to the frozen Ishim River in the hope of catching fish beneath the ice. The Ishim flows through the country’s capital, Astana, a high-rise, futuristic city that was built virtually from scratch in the 1990s, when the exploitation of Kazakhstan’s oil reserves began. The city is intended to be an emblem of post-Soviet modernity and a hallmark of the country’s entrance into the global economy. On the ice, the fishermen brave temperatures that often reach forty degrees below zero. While they fish, they protect themselves from the harsh weather with salvaged pieces of plastic, patched together from discarded packaging or rice bags found outside markets selling western, Chinese and Russian goods. By looking at the appropriation of these imported materials and their subsidiary application, Kondratyev illuminates the material flow of global capitalism and its effect on local, nomadic practices. Tracking this flow reveals the point at which international trade policy meets individual lives.

A 60-page monograph of Ice Fishers is forthcoming from Loose Joints Publishing.

Aleksey Kondratyev (b. 1993 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) received his BFA from Wayne State University in Detroit and is a current MFA candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles. Kondratyev’s work has been exhibited at the Neue Schule für Fotografie in Berlin; the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rome; Les Rencontres d’Arles; the Benaki Museum in Athens; and the Galleria Foto-Forum in Bolzano. His work has been published in the Financial Times, CNN, Der Spiegel, the New York Times, Vogue, and National Geographic. He lives in Los Angeles.

LINKS:

Vogue
Booooooom
The Guardian
Burn Magazine
FotoRoom
Aleksey’s website

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an initiative at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, Ctrl+P provides further exposure for new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the Internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended—in print.

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Opening tonight: How do you see me? Photographs by Alanna Airitam, Endia Beal and Medina Dugger

We are thrilled to open the fall season with a compelling show by three women who confront the way African Americans are perceived in art, the work place, and through their physical appearance. How do you see me? features photographs by Alanna Airitam, Endia Beal and Medina Dugger. Each artist’s work will be presented in a unique and non-traditional manner.

The show opens this evening, September 7 and runs through October 27, 2018. Alanna Airitam and Endia Beal will be at the opening reception tonight from 5:00 to 8:00 pm.

When Alanna Airitam (b. 1971, Queens, NY) was studying the history of art, she noticed the absence of black people in the history of Western art. This exclusion is familiar to many dark-skinned people who are used to seeing themselves represented in paintings and films as domestic workers, slaves or barbarians. By inviting African Americans to pose in the style of classic Dutch portraiture, Airitam reclaims art history, shining a light on the racial disparity in her series, The Golden Age. Titling her images after places in Harlem — Saint Sugar Hill, Saint Minton and Saint Lenox — the artist pays homage to the Harlem Renaissance, which opened doors for many young African Americans working today. It is a powerful series that celebrates black identity while highlighting the racial divide that exists throughout art history.

Endia Beal (b. 1985, Winston-Salem, NC) focuses her camera on how African American women are perceived in the corporate world based on their physical appearance.  As a young black woman in a mostly white dominated corporate job, Beal knew people talked behind her back about her hair, which did not conform to their definition of beauty. Now, as a professor at Winston Salem State University, Beal  tackles the stereotypes that her students and other black women face when they do not fit the corporate mold. Am I What You’re Looking For? poses black women in front of a photographic backdrop of a typical office setting, wearing an outfit they find suitable for work. Through this work, Beal challenges the viewer to look at their own biases or sterotypes as they view the photographs.

Medina Dugger (b. 1983, Corpus Christi, TX) pays homage to Nigerian photographer J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere, whose 40 year black and white photographic study of African women’s hairstyles set the standard for the celebration of black hair culture. African hair braiding methods date back thousands of years and Nigerian hair culture is a rich and often extensive process, which begins in childhood. The methods and variations have been influenced by social/cultural patterns, historical events and globalization. Hairdos range from being purely decorative to conveying deeper, more symbolic understandings, revealing social status, age and tribal/family traditions. In her Lagos studio, Dugger pays homage to historical and imagined hairstyles, honoring Ojeikere’s work through a contemporary lens in her series Chroma: An Ode to J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere.

How do you see me? brings together work by three women who dare to question racial stereotypes and biases that are seen in our history books and continue to exist today. Through these important photographs, the artists challenge the perception of beauty, and the different standards that exist based on skin color.

Catherine Edelman will be in conversation with Alanna Airitam, Sheridan Tucker Anderson, Jeffreen Hayes and Kate Lorenz on Thursday, October 18, from 5:30 to 7:30 PM at 300 West Superior Street. A reception in the gallery will follow the panel discussion. More information and a link to RSVP can be found here

The entire exhibition can be seen on our website.

 

Opening tonight! The Chicago Project VII: Selections from our Online Gallery!

CEG  is proud to present our biannual summer exhibition, The Chicago Project VII: Selections from our Online Gallery, featuring the work of Barbara Diener, Jim Ferguson, Whit Forrester, Andy Goodwin, Angie McMonigal, Natasha Spencer, and Samantha VanDeman. The opening reception with the artists is tonight, July 13, from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm!

2018 marks the fifteen-year anniversary of The Chicago Project, created in 2003 as an online-only gallery devoted to unrepresented photographers in the Chicagoland area. In an effort to promote local talent, Catherine Edelman Gallery put out a call for submission to all local photographers, that exists on a year round basis. To date, the site has featured more than 100 photographers whose images range from traditional black & white landscapes and documentary work, to color narratives and digital constructions. The goal of the online gallery is to expose local artists to our ever-increasing global audience of curators and collectors.

Barbara Diener
Born in 1982 in Germany Barbara Diener received her Bachelor of Fine Art in photography from the California College of the Arts and Masters in Fine Art in Photography from Columbia College Chicago. Her work has been exhibited at Alibi Fine Art, Chicago, IL, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL, Hyde Park Art Center, Hyde Park, IL, David Weinberg Gallery, Chicago, IL, New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM, Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester, MA, Invisible Dog Gallery, Brooklyn, NY, Lilllstreet Art Center, Chicago, IL, Riverside Art Center, Chicago, IL. Pingyao Photo Festival, China, The Arcade, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, Philadelphia, PA, Darkroom Gallery, Essex Junction, VT and Project Basho, Philadelphia, PA among others. Diener’s photographs are part of several private and institutional collections including the New Mexico Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Photography.

Tracing Spirits (American Flag), 2015 © Barbara Diener
Tracing Spirits (American Flag), 2015 © Barbara Diener

In 2013 Diener was selected to participate in two highly ambitious and competitive artist residency programs, the Fields Project in Oregon, IL and ACRE in Steuben, WI and she is currently participating in the residency program HATCH Projects 2015-2016 through the Chicago Artist Coaltition.

Diener is a winner of Flash Forward 2013, the recipient of a Follett Fellowship at Columbia College Chicago and was awarded the Albert P. Weisman Award in 2012 and 2013. In addition Diener received an Individual Artist Grant from the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Events in 2015. She is the Collection Manager in the Department of Photography at the Art Institute of Chicago and teaches photography at Oakton Community College and at the School of the Art Institute.

smoke in forest
Smoke in Forest, 2017 © Barbara Diener

Phantom Power
In my previous body of work, Sehnsucht, I photographed in small, rural towns that triggered childhood memories. During that process I met and became fascinated with a woman named Kathy. She owns the diner in her town and lives on her husband’s family farm, which is haunted by his ancestors. Her belief in the spectral sparked my own interest in the unexplained and ties back to my ongoing curiosity about religion, spirituality and the human desire to believe that something else happens after we die and that a part of us–the spirit or soul–continues on.

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Infared Tree, 2016 © Barbara Diener

The camera is a crucial tool for most paranormal investigators, so it was a natural step for me to become an amateur ghost hunter myself. Photography has been linked to the spirit world since the 1860s with the popularity of spirit photography and post-mortem portraits. Since its invention photography has lent a sense of immortality to its subjects. In recent years the paranormal has received amplified media attention through numerous ‘reality’ television programs that sensationalize any phenomena for the camera. On the contrary my approach is self-reflective and curious. To make the resulting images I have adopted both traditional and contemporary methods of capturing the invisible, as well as employed my own interpretation of the magical and mystical.

Jim Ferguson
I like to classify myself not as an emerging artist but as a reemerging artist. I have a BFA from San Francisco Art Institute and MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. After getting my BFA, I started showing and selling my work. As a result of this effort my work is in the collections of the Dallas Museum of Art, Seattle Art Museum, Museo Nacional de Antropologia- Mexico, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, and numerous private collections. I am also included in the Macmillian Encyclopedia of Photographic Artists and Innovators. I took an extended leave of absence from showing but not photographing.  Now I’m reemerging into the fine art photography scene.

Reconstructed Space 2, 1986
Reconstructed Space 02, 1986 © Jim Ferguson

Reconstructed Space
Reconstructed Space is a portfolio made up of abstract landscape images taken in Europe, Asia, Latin America and the U.S. My intent was to share the hidden realities I see with my altered sense of depth perception.

Born cross-eyed, corrective surgery left me with no depth perception. I developed a different way of seeing things, measuring spaces, layers and distances that I use in my photography. It is this vision I share with my viewers.

Reconstructed Space 9, 2014
Reconstructed Space 09, 2014 © Jim Ferguson

Once I select a scene, I deconstruct then reconstruct the scene to show the viewer my take on the place, often creating an unfamiliar and potentially a disorienting depiction. I sometimes reinterpret a space by flattening and compressing layers of the various elements in the image.

I emphasize light, shadow, form and movement, in an effort to depict my personal perspective. By purposefully avoiding people and turning off color in my images I am able to produce a cleaner, stronger, more abstract photograph that brings out the graphic nature and textural elements in the shot.

Most of my photographs are taken outside the U.S., often in familiar locations. However, in my reconstructed images the locations become ambiguous. The scenes can be elusive. There is normally something, or enough in the image, that allows the viewer to define the image for themselves…to pull them into my work. I don’t care where they land as long as it’s a thoughtful landing. This allows the viewer to be part of the act of creation.

While often drawn to historical settings such as Medieval and Colonial towns and archaeological sites, I don’t feel obligated photographically to illustrate the preceding history, but to transform the place into powerful images that are both enigmatic and engaging.

 

Whit Forrester
Forrester is based in Chicago, IL. He has a BA in Environmental Studies from Oberlin College and an MFA in Photography from Columbia College. He has exhibited widely, in both national and international contexts, and has a range of aesthetic interests that include: practices of accumulation, manifestations of power, diaspora, noetic science, new materialisms, discourses around the transcendent and the material relationship between self and world. These encounter fusion around ideas of collective liberation, quantum feminisms, queer theory, and decolonization as a spiritual practice.

Fig. 47 Aloe vera, Louisville, KY, 2016
Fig. 47 Aloe vera, Louisville, KY, 2016 © Whit Forrester

Domesticating the Numinous
As principal actors in nature, plants energize the spaces of my research and work. Here, historical and contemporary aesthetic dimensions intersect with our assumed relationships to the natural world, and to what is known as the Divine or spiritual. At this juncture I primarily employ photographic processes alongside historical techniques of representation to place the work in conversation with art and colonial histories. Gold to represent light, light to represent the Divine, and a portraiture which exists at the edge of still life and iconography. The resulting works are intended to guide our responses as both viewers and participants in the larger world, taking cues from new materialism and the ongoing discourses that conjoin the metaphysical and quantum.

Fig. 65b Crassula ovata, Chicago, IL
Fig. 65b Crassula ovata, Chicago, IL, 2016 © Whit Forrester

Inside these aesthetic realms’ and metaphysical environment’s relationship to power, the natural world as the subject takes on multiple roles. It serves as a historical recipient, an active participant (equal in importance to our human physicality and spirituality), and ultimately a collaborative transformer for the social relationships that compose larger systems of economic and societal power. I am ultimately interested in the potential of houseplants to queer our perceptions of our environments through the capitulation that they are, in fact, living multidimensional prints of the divine themselves.


Andy Goodwin
Most of my time is spent in the commercial photography world shooting for clients like Sony, John Deere, Aflac, Boeing, GM, FORBES and others. However, it’s my personal and pro bono projects that excite me the most.

Charreada
The Charreada, predecessor to the American Rodeo.

charreada-2-2015
Charreada [Ref. #2], 2015 © Andy Goodwin

What began as a curious look into a sport I was unfamiliar with became a fascinating journey into the world of the Charro, a proud culture filled with ordinary Mexican Americans who suit up on the weekends to keep their tradition alive. The time and money spent perfecting these skills handed down from 100 years ago is an incredible spectacle to behold. It’s a dangerous sport and the rewards are often little or nothing with men commonly getting injured.

Charreada 1, 2015 © Andy Goodwin
Charreada [Ref. #1], 2015 © Andy Goodwin

Tradition can be a good enough reason to participate in something but there is a shared importance and comfort here that I think helps these dedicated horsemen stay connected to each other and to a heritage that must seem far away.

This work has been recognized by National Geographic and has won awards with The Smithsonian and The Creative Quarterly.

 

Angie McMonigal
Angie McMonigal moved to Chicago more than 15 years ago and has been exploring the city with her camera ever since. Raised in a small town in Wisconsin, she approaches the urban environment with the spirit of someone who grew up surrounded by nature, finding moments of meditative calm in terrain that is always transforming. Focusing more frequently on bold architectural details rather than sweeping cityscapes, her photographs celebrate those unexpectedly iconic elements hiding in plain sight. From landmark buildings she distills the essential lines and textures that frame the city. McMonigal sees these structures as actively shaping, and shaped by, human activity; they are never mere backdrop. Steel and brick towers are presented as quilts rich with history, solid structures soar with soul, and concrete edifices echo the lofty ambition of planners and dreamers.

An award-winning fine art photographer, Angie’s work has been internationally exhibited and published. Her photos have been showcased by galleries in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and other destinations. Publication credits include National Geographic, Departures, and SHOTS Magazine. She has received awards from the International Photography Awards (IPA) and Prix de la Photographie Paris (Px3), among others.

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Urban Quilt 8473, 2016 © Angie McMonigal

Urban Quilt
In the city that built the first skyscraper, the lines that structure the urban landscape run north and south, east and west thus creating ‘the grid’. This is not just a tool for getting around; it’s the secret code that makes order out of chaos. However, the most striking lines are the ones that run from street to sky. The facades of Chicago’s imposing towers make up this whole other grid, the one staring straight at you, composed of windows, beams, balconies, pillars, rooflines.

We are surrounded by horizontal and vertical lines repeating rhythmically in steel, brick, stone, and glass. I’ve started to see this grid as a quilt. Because I don’t just see individual buildings standing there as imposing towers of steel. I see a patchwork. Different colors, different textures, different materials, different architectural styles, all pieced together. Some patches are pristine and new, others a little more worn. There are iconic patterns, immediately recognizable, and also bits that are hard to identify, fragments that feel familiar but are hard to place. Some blocks make clear that they were destined to be joined together, others look like accidents, or even challenging points of tension.

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Urban Quilt 1083, 2016 © Angie McMonigal

We often think of photographs as capturing a single moment in time. A shutter clicks, an instant is preserved. When I started photographing the city as an urban quilt, I became more aware of the way these buildings preserve different moments from our history. Those moments aren’t arranged in a nice orderly timeline like you’d find in a history book or a museum display. They’re standing next to each other, layered on top of one another. My photographs flatten out the miles between the streets and erase the years that separate one construction project from the next. It’s all stitched together now on a single plane.

 

Natasha Spencer
Natasha Spencer is an interdisciplinary, American artist. Her digital work has screened in film, video, and new media venues across the country and abroad. Her audio piece, “The House She Flew In On”, is included on the compilation CD, “Extracted Celluloid”, produced by Illegal Art, Negativland, and RtMark, and has aired on the John Peel’s Show, Radio 1, BBC, London. In 2002 she was awarded a residency at The Wexner Center for the Arts Video Lab where she completed “The House She Flew In On : The Video” and “Somewhere”. Natasha received a 2004 Fellowship in the Media Arts from the Illinois Arts Council and an Illinois Art Council Fellowship in the Visual Arts in 1999. Additionally, she is archived at the The National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington DC. Natasha currently works and resides in Chicago, IL.

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Clownfish Stripes, Postmortem © Natasha Spencer

Visual Improv
When materials in an environment interplay in such a way that they allow everyday scenes to be framed as culture narratives; What went unnoticed is now obvious as a found object. Each photograph is a document of such observations, taken without further manipulation on my part, during the comings-and-goings of the day.

Samantha VanDeman
Born in 1982, Samantha VanDeman grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. She studied fine arts at Columbia College Chicago, receiving a BFA in 2005. In 2007, she returned to college, this time to earn a MFA in visual arts from the Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University in 2009.

Blue_Sofa_-_Hotel_Columbia_in_Sharon_Springs__New_York__2012_
Blue Sofa – Hotel Columbia in Sharon Springs, New York, 2012 © Samantha VanDeman

Samantha has been exhibited her work at Emory Visual Arts Gallery, Atlanta, GA; Finch and Ada, NY; New Orleans Photo Alliance Gallery, New Orleans, LA; Las Manos Gallery, Chicago, IL; Gallery 263, Cambridge, MA; Midwest center for Photography, Wichita, KS; Gallery 808, Boston, MA; Change Artist Space, San Francisco, CA; Perspective Gallery, Evanston, IL; Barrett Art Center Galleries, Poughkeepsie, NY and Fourth Wall Projects in Boston, MA; Center for Photography at Woodstock, NY; Rayko Photo center, San Francisco, CA; Smashbox Studios, Culver City, CA; Newspace Center for Photography, Portland, OR; The Center for Fine Art Photography, Fort Collins, CO; Wall Space Gallery, Santa Barbara, CA. She most recently was selected as a winner for Flash Forward 2013 and won first place for architectural interiors in The International Photography Awards. Samantha’s work has been published in SHOTS Magazine, LENSCRATCH, F-Stop Magazine, CDS Porch and International Photography Annual.

Television_Room_-_Thomas_Jefferson_Hotel_in_Birmingham__Alabama__2011_
Television Room – Thomas Jefferson Hotel in Birmingham, Alabama, 2011 © Samantha VanDeman

No Vacancy
No Vacancy is an ongoing photographic series documenting abandoned hotel interiors that have sat vacant for nearly five to thirty years.

Three_Red_Chairs_-_Hotel_Washington_in_Sharon_Springs__New_York__2013_
Three Red Chairs – Hotel Washington in Sharon Springs, New York, 2013 © Samantha VanDeman

In my work, I’m often drawn to abandoned places that appear to be frozen in time. I use my camera to examine these places that have been forgotten by society. Through the use of color and light, I attempt to capture the beauty that once existed in these magnificent environments. By photographing these hotels, I hope to provide a visual record of what might be lost forever.

See the entire exhibition in full on our website here, and join us tonight for the opening reception with the artists!

In the Artist’s Studio with Francesco Pergolesi

We are proud to be exhibiting Francesco Pergolesi’s second solo show at CEG, “Tableaux.” The work on view pulls from the artist’s original series Heroes, which captures independent shopkeepers and artisans framed in their storefronts, standing guard at their small businesses in the face of globalization. Pergolesi’s newest series, Tableaux, focuses on the details one can find throughout these shops–tabletops and work counters covered in years of wear-and-tear. Abstract images are created from paint, flour, tools and other objects that Pergolesi finds in his Heroes’ work surfaces.

What at first might look like a monochromatic landscape, “Minturnae, 2016” shows the flour-covered, marble counter behind the shopfront featured in “Dino, Roma, 2014.” Another of Francesco Pergolesi’s Heroes, “Charlie, Roma, 2016,” makes the bread.

dino-roma-2014
Dino, Roma, 2014 © Francesco Pergolesi
Minturnae, 2016
Minturnae, 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi
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Charlie, Roma, 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi
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Bread loaves ready for baking.

 

Pergolesi also designed memory boxes to be paired with each image in his Tableaux series. The memory box for “21-21, 2018” is on view in the show. You can watch a short video of this memory box’s construction below:

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A test strip of “ES, 2016” being printed.
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A test print of “21-12, 2018” hanging in Francesco Pergolesi’s Spoleto studio.
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Various test prints hanging in the studio.

The artist states: “Tableaux is a project dedicated to the worktables of artists and artisans… Every table is a canvas generated unconsciously, thanks to the traces of daily work. The material is the tangible representation of memory…every detail becomes magnified, emphasizing the worth and uniqueness of the artisan’s work. The worktable is a reliable place, an esoteric shelter where day after day, year after year, generations repeat skillful gestures, generating ideas and solutions. It is a place where one puts together and transforms materials.”

“Francesco Pergolesi: Tableaux” is on view through July 7, 2018. See the exhibition in full on our website here.

 

 

 

 

 

Final day of Photo London

We are headed into our final day of Photo London! We’ve had an outstanding week at the Somerset House and have enjoyed meeting everyone who has visited us so far. Today is your last chance to visit the fair, beginning at noon and ending at 6:30 pm (18:30). We are thrilled to be featuring the work of Daniel BeltráClarissa BonetOmar ImamMichael KoernerYsabel LeMayLaurent MilletFrancesco Pergolesi, and Gregory Scott! Spend your Sunday with us at booth G15!

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Catch up with us here on Cyclopsblog, TwitterInstagram, and Facebook for highlights and behind-the-scenes images from London! Plan your visit to the fair here, and be sure to visit booth G15! Stateside viewers can also see the booth in full on our website here.

Photo London
May 16 – 20, 2018
Somerset House
Strand
London
WC2R 1LA

Sunday 20 May 12:00 – 18:30

@edelmangallery @photolondonfair #photolondonfair2018

Jump start your weekend at Photo London!

Today is your second to last day to visit Photo London! The fair today begins at noon and ends at 7:30 pm (19:30). So even if your weekend plans include watching the royal wedding, you’ll still have time to visit. We are thrilled to be featuring the work of eight photographers at booth G15, two of which you can read about below.

Daniel BeltráScreen Shot 2018-05-16 at 9.51.03 AM

Born in Madrid, Spain, Daniel Beltrá is a photographer based in Seattle, Washington. His passion for conservation is evident in images of our environment that are evocatively poignant. His striking, large-scale photographs are shot from the air. This perspective gives the viewer a wider context to the beauty and destruction he witnesses, as well as revealing a delicate sense of scale. After two months of photographing the Deepwater Horizon Gulf Oil Spill, he produced many visually arresting images of the man-made disaster. His SPILL exhibit premiered in August 2010 and has toured around the globe since then.

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Amazon scarlet ibis (#222), 2017 © Daniel Beltrá

Over the past two decades, Beltrá’s work has taken him to all seven continents, including several expeditions to the Brazilian Amazon, the Arctic, the Southern Oceans and the Patagonian ice fields. For his work on the Gulf Oil Spill, in 2011 he received the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Award , the Lucie Award for the International Photographer of the Year – Deeper Perspective, and was chosen as one of the six finalists for Critical Mass for Photolucida. In 2009, Beltrá received the prestigious Prince’s Rainforest Project award granted by Prince Charles. Other highlights include the BBVA Foundation award in 2013 and the inaugural “Global Vision Award” from the Pictures of the Year International in 2008. In 2007 and again in 2018, he received awards for his work in the Amazon from World Press Photo. Daniel’s work has been published by the most prominent international publications including The New Yorker, Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, Le Monde, and El Pais, amongst many others.

Daniel Beltrá is a fellow and board member of the prestigious International League of Conservation Photographers.

Laurent MilletScreen Shot 2018-05-16 at 9.50.48 AM

For more than twenty years, Laurent Millet has channeled his innate curiosity to create photographs that question the way objects appear within space and time. Citing R. Buckminster Fuller and Denis Diderot among his influences, Millet creates an artistic vocabulary through metal wire, vineyard posts and barrel hoops – objects prevalent in the coastal town of France in which he resides. There is a rich history of artists constructing environments simply to be photographed and then disassembled. These created realities were prevalent in the 1980s, as works by Sandy Skoglund, Bernard Faucon, Bruce Charlesworth, James Welling and other artists burst onto the scene. All of these artists worked with objects to create a narrative, captured by the camera. Laurent Millet (b. 1968 France) continues to work in this tradition, using various 19th c. printing techniques to magnify his vision.

 

As he stated in a 2014 interview in L’Oeil de la Photographie: “I felt like I had to take refuge in something that was comforting and reassuring… This idea brought me back to what I did as a child in the countryside when I would play with wood and stones. I rediscovered that pleasure as an adult… Starting with the first things I built, fishing machines, I felt like a world was opening up in which I could really exist. These objects are powered by my personal fictions, my dream of another life. The photograph is proof of that, a record of the moment, a reward.”

 

Laurent Millet’s work can be seen in numerous publications including his 2014 book, Les Enfantillages Pittoresques (Filigranes Editions) and in major museum collections, including The Art Institute of Chicago, Maison Européenne de la Photographie (Paris), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and Fonds National d’art Contemporain (Paris), among others.

Follow along with us this week on Cyclopsblog, TwitterInstagram, and Facebook for highlights and behind-the-scenes images from London! Plan your visit to the fair here, and be sure to visit booth G15! Stateside viewers can also see the booth in full on our website here.

Photo London
May 16 – 20, 2018
Somerset House
Strand
London
WC2R 1LA

Saturday 19 May 12:00 – 19:30
Sunday 20 May 12:00 – 18:30

@edelmangallery @photolondonfair #photolondonfair2018