New Heroes by Francesco Pergolesi

After living in Turin for a few months, Francesco Pergolesi was inspired to make new photographs. We are excited to share the new images and look forward to showing all three (and more) in March at The Photography show, presented by AIPAD.

Theodore, 2017
Theodore, 2017
Moira, 2017
Moira, 2017
Amelie, 2017
Amelie, 2017

Francesco’s images made 2016-present are available as 4 x 6″ or 10 x 15″ pigment print mounted to plexi, framed and backlit with LED light and 23½ x 35½” pigment print in an editions of 7 + 2 AP’s and 3 + 2 AP’s, respectively. Pieces range in price from $1500 – $4000, depending on size and availability. You can see the entire Heroes series on our website here.

New work by Gregory Scott and Ysabel LeMay

Today we continue to introduce the artists we are featuring at Art Miami booth B300. In this post you can read about Ysabel LeMay and Gregory Scott. Both artists have new work premiering at Art Miami!

Ysabel LeMay

Quebec born Ysabel LeMay found photography later in life, after a successful career working as a graphic artist for prominent advertising agencies. Seeking greater fulfillment, she turned to painting, and in 2002, left the corporate world to pursue painting full time. Eight years later, she turned her attention to photography, garnering significant success in a few short years. Combining her technical expertise with her painterly eye, LeMay creates photographs that challenge our perception of the landscape.

nebula-2016
Nebula, 2016 © Ysabel LeMay

Lemay’s technique is very straightforward, yet extremely time consuming. She photographs flora, birds, tree limbs, flowers, and anything else she finds along her daily walks. Once back in the studio, she assembles all her files into her computer and starts layering images, using hundreds of individual files to construct each final photograph. Balancing color, light and subject, Ysabel LeMay creates pieces that vibrate with an intensity often experienced in dreams. She achieves this effect by painting the background of her photographs similarly to our other artist, Gregory Scott. At Art Miami you can see her pieces from the series Gracia.

Cosmea, 2016
Cosmea, 2016 © Ysabel LeMay

Gregory Scott

In 2008, Gregory Scott stunned the art world with his mixed-media video works that combined installation, photography, performance, video and painting. As more and more artists blur the lines between media, Scott has taken the idea to a whole new level, presenting video-based wall pieces that are humorous and poignant, contemplative yet accessible.

Georgia and Alfred, 2016 © Gregory Scott
Georgia and Alfred, 2016 © Gregory Scott

Gregory Scott builds sets in his studio that serve as his subject. In these sets, he records himself performing a variety of scenarios that are then edited into 6-10 minute videos. The sets are then photographed, and the resulting wall piece is a mounted photograph with a cut out for a monitor on which a video plays, and a painted element appears on the photographic surface. In each video, he shows how he constructed the set that he photographed, breaking down the barrier between maker and viewer. All of the hardware is attached to the inside of the frame, making his works self-contained.

 

To see more work from our booth, please visit our website!

Download a complimentary pass for Art Miami on our website here.

November 29 – December 4, 2016
The Art Miami Pavilion
Midtown | Wynwood Arts District
3101 NE 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33137

 

 

 

 

 

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New work by Jess T. Dugan

We are thrilled to share three new photographs by Jess T. Dugan. You can see more of her images from her ongoing series To Survive on This Shore on her website.

Preston, 52, East Haven, CT, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Preston, 52, East Haven, CT, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Rosalind, 65, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Rosalind, 65, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Sukie, 59, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Sukie, 59, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
To Survive on This Shore combines photographs of transgender and gender variant people over the age of 50 with interviews about their life experiences in regards to gender, identity, age, and sexuality and provides a nuanced view into the complexities of aging as a transgender person.  The project is made in collaboration with Vanessa Fabbre, a social worker and Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, whose research explores the intersection of LGBTQ issues and gerontology, focusing specifically on transgender and queer perspectives on aging and the life course. By combining our experiences working as a photographer and social worker within the transgender community, we hope to create a project that is simultaneously highly personal and socially relevant.

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Behind the Scenes with Jerry Spagnoli

Today is History features three contemporary artists who are working with 19th century photographic processes to talk about present day concerns. The show consists of tintypes by Dan Estabrook, orotones by Kate Breakey and daguerreotypes by Jerry Spagnoli.

Over the next few weeks, we will share behind the scenes photos, videos and explanations about how each photographer uses these historical processes. We will start by defining and learning how to make a daguerreotype.

Glass 3-7-12, 2012 © Jerry Spagnoli

“Louis J.M. Daguerre introduced the Daguerreotype process to the public in 1839. The Daguerreotype was the first and only successful photographic process until the 1850s. During the 1840s and 1850s, Daguerreotype plates were commercially produced and easily available. The plates were replaced in the 1860s by the Calotype, which were much cheaper and easier to produce.

Daguerreotypes are created by polishing a silver plate, then exposing it to the vapors of iodine and bromine, which produces silver salts on the surface. The coated plate then goes directly into the camera, where it is exposed to light. After the plate is exposed to light, it is developed by being exposed to heated mercury fumes, and fixed by pouring sodium thiosulfate over the plate.” [Source: Alternative Processes: Daguerreotype with Jerry Spagnoli]

In this video Jerry Spagnoli explains the process of making a daguerreotype.

Jerry Spagnoli (b. 1956 New York City, NY) is credited as today’s preeminent photographer working with the daguerreotype, a polished copper plate treated with mercury vapor. Using this material, Spagnoli has photographed significant historical events, including the horrors of the World Trade Center and the beauty of Times Square on the eve of the Millennium. In his 2012 series, Glasses, Spagnoli tackles the reflective quality of everyday water glasses. As he states, “Ultimately my use of various materials and methods is centered in my desire to make complicated stories out of the everyday world, which is my apparent subject matter. Photography allows me to engage viewers with images and ideas which are filtered through the abstracting apparatus of the camera and woven into the matrix of its rich history.

Install picture of Jerry Spagnoli's work
Install picture of Jerry Spagnoli’s work

You can see all of Jerry’s work includeding Today is History  on our website. They are also on view at the gallery until December 31!

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Introducing Ctrl+P Artist: Sian Davey

We are thrilled to feature the work of Sian Davey as the next Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist. Four photographs are on view at the gallery from her Looking for Alice series through December 31, 2016.

Winter Virus ii (Alice asleep), Winter, 2014
Winter Virus ii (Alice asleep), Winter, 2014 © Sian Davey

Sian Davey is a photographer with a background in Fine Art and Social Policy. Originally from Brighton in the U.K. Sian is now based in South Devon, in the South West of England. Sian had a private Psychotherapy practice for 15 years, but has recently closed this in order to commit to her photography practice full-time. Her work is an investigation of the psychological landscapes of both herself and those around her. Her family and community are central to her work.

Sian completed her MA in Photography and her MFA (2016) in Photography at Plymouth University. She has been the recipient for numerous awards including more recently winning the Arnold Newman Award for New Directions in Portraiture and for the last three years (2014-2016) has been selected for the Taylor Wessing Portrait Award at the National Gallery in London.

Sian’s first book Looking for Alice (Trolley Books) was published in 2015 and is currently shortlisted for Photobook of the Year at the 2016 Aperture Foundation Awards at Paris Photo 2016.

Garden Gate, Summer, 2014
Garden Gate, Summer, 2014 © Sian Davey

Looking for Alice

Alice is my daughter and I started to photograph her when she was a year old. She was born with Down’s Syndrome, but is no different to any other little girl or indeed human being; she feels what we all feel and needs what you and I need. Similarly, my family is a microcosm for the dynamics occurring in many other families – all the joys, tensions, ups and downs that go with the territory of being in a family.

In my previous work  as a psychotherapist I have listened to many stories and what was revealed to me, during my  fifteen years of practice, is not how different we are to one another, but how alike we are.  The stories vary, but we are all vulnerable to the same feelings of shame, anger, grief, pride and so the list goes on.

Early on in the pregnancy my partner and I were told we had a high probability that we were carrying a baby with Down’s Syndrome. Despite this, I was not prepared for how I would feel after Alice was born and diagnosed. I was deeply shocked, it was not what I had really expected. Our first experiences in hospital did little to diffuse this.

After examining  Alice, the paediatrician  announced that we should ‘take her home and treat her like any other baby’. But she didn’t feel like my other babies. I was fraught with an anxiety that rippled through to every aspect of my relationship with her and, that penetrated my dreams. I dreamt that Alice was swaddled in a blanket and that I had forgotten all about her. In my dream I unwrapped the tight bundle to feed her, only to discover that she was covered in a white fluid – a fluid of neglect; and I was unable to feed her, unable to respond to her basic needs.

Godmother, Summer, 2014 © Sian Davey
Godmother, Summer, 2014 © Sian Davey

I could sense  that Alice was feeling my rejection of her and knew that the responsibility lay with me to work this out and find a way through the fear which as getting in the way of loving her. As my fears dissolved I fell in love with my daughter.

Alice entered a world where routine screening at twelve weeks gestation is entirely weighted towards birth prevention, rather than birth preparation.  Whilst we make our selection and decisions in private, the effect on society is that in the UK, the latest figures (in 2015) tell us that ninety two per cent of Down’s Syndrome babies are terminated at the pre-natal screening stage. Even prior to the introduction of screening, children such as Alice would have been severely marginalized and often institutionalized, with little or limited medical care.

Sitting with a Stranger, 2014
Sitting with a Stranger, 2014 © Sian Davey

Ultimately, this is a story about love and what gets in the way. This concerns all of us, my daughter’s diagnosis is only one aspect of it. The rest is about yours and mine, and indeed society’s relationship with ‘difference’ of all kinds – this is what Alice is inviting us to reflect on.

The process of photographing this work has helped me shine a light on why I struggled to love Alice, which was essentially fear and uncertainty. The project has been very much a co-creation and I have no doubt that Alice has guided to me to what needed to be expressed and understood.

She is now in the middle of everything that we do as a family and is loved unconditionally, as it should be. I can’t help but wonder how it might be for Alice to be always valued everywhere, without distinction, without exception, without a second glance.

This project is for her, for Alice

LINKS:
Sian Davey website
LensCulture
The Guardian
Slate
Aint Bad

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

 

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Today Is History: Kate Breakey, Dan Estabrook & Jerry Spagnoli Opening Reception

We are excited to present three photographers in Today is History, which examines the use of early photographic techniques among today’s practitioners. Work by Kate Breakey, Dan Estabrook and Jerry Spagnoli will be featured. The show opens November 4 and runs through December 31, 2016.

Opening reception:
Friday, November 4, 2016
5:00 – 7:30pm

Gallery view - Today is History exhibition
Gallery view – Today is History exhibition

First it was questioned as art. Then painters used it as a tool. Decades later it was still defending itself as a viable art form. And now, more than 175 years after its inception, photography is an exalted medium, embraced by galleries, collectors and museums worldwide. While photographers engage with new technologies and new means of presentation, many artists working today still incorporate historical techniques in their work. Today is History brings together three artists who work with 19th / 20th c. processes to talk about present day concerns.

Kate Breakey (B. 1957 Adelaide, South Australia) is best known for her large-scale photographic work with birds and flowers that she painstakingly brings back to life with colored pencils. These pieces can be seen in two monographs, Small Deaths (2001) and Flowers/Birds (2003). In 2014, Breakey turned her focus to the land, and the small details of everyday life: a hummingbird resting on a tree limb, a wilting tulip, figs on a counter, the moon setting over the mountain, trees swaying in the evening dusk. Produced as Orotones (prints made on glass and backed with 23k gold leaf) Breakey creates small objects that command our attention, using an early technique to comment on the beauty, fragility and simplicity of her daily surroundings.

Kate Breakey's salon style installation
Kate Breakey’s salon style installation

For more than 30 years, Dan Estabrook’s (b. 1969 Boston, MA) work has been at the intersection of yesterday and today. Working with salt prints, calotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes, Estabrook creates art that echoes his life, loves, desires and fears. Like many practitioners before him, he turns the camera on himself to make contemporary works inspired by the gap between today’s photographic perfection and the past’s technical limitations. As he states: “Using 19th-century techniques and celebrating their flaws and failures, I make seemingly anonymous photographs in order to re-imagine a more personal and dream-like history of photography, seen from a 21st-century perspective. With these processes, I can create my own ‘found photos’ – highly personal objects in which to hide my own secrets and stories.”

Jerry Spagnoli (b. 1956 New York City, NY) is credited as today’s preeminent photographer working with the daguerreotype, a polished copper plate treated with mercury vapor. Using this material, Spagnoli has photographed significant historical events, including the horrors of the World Trade Center and the beauty of Times Square on the eve of the Millennium. In his 2012 series, Glasses, Spagnoli tackles the reflective quality of everyday water glasses. As he states, “Ultimately my use of various materials and methods is centered in my desire to make complicated stories out of the everyday world, which is my apparent subject matter. Photography allows me to engage viewers with images and ideas which are filtered through the abstracting apparatus of the camera and woven into the matrix of its rich history.”

Today is History: Kate Breakey, Dan Estabrook & Jerry Spagnoli
November 4 – December 31, 2016
Please visit our website to view all images in this exhibition.

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Francesco Pergolesi creates two new pieces!

We are excited to share two new pieces by Francesco Pergolesi! To see more images from his Hereos series visit our website.

furio-roma-2016
Furio, Roma 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi
luna-barcelona-2016
Luna, Barcelona, 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi

Heroes

Temple guardians of a little vanishing world, brave and full of passion, they valiantly defend the meeting places for human exchange and relationships, set in unpretentious frames, nibbled by the passing of time.

As survivors on a tiny damaged raft, they face restlessness and greed, on a dangerous sea that doesn’t care about the past and its traditions, smashing together people and principles, obeying the march of progress.

Before it’s too late I shelter memories smelling of yellow paper, and “Ceci n’est pas une pipe,” like a freshly gathered broad bean listening to the gossip of old pilgrims, religiously sitting on green Formica chairs, conserving cloth in dusty trunks and expert hands. They cut cloth in the dead of night, while I preserve pure white clouds made by an ancient pink oven, as old as time; work done by glue and saw, buds and sharp prickles, made by a real good morning and good night!

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