AIPAD 2018 opens to the public

Catherine with Spectrum News NY1
Catherine interviewed on Spectrum News NY1

Thanks to everyone who joined us for Vernissage yesterday! We had a great opening night and are looking forward to the first full day open to the public! Read on to learn more about some of our featured artists, many of whom are debuting new work at booth 402.

Omar Imam

Untitled, 2017 © Omar Imam. From the series, Syrialism
Untitled, 2017 © Omar Imam. From the series, Syrialism.

In 2012, Syrian activist turned photographer Omar Imam (b. 1979 Damascus) was kidnapped and tortured by a militia and only let go when a friend intervened. Soon after, Imam left Damascus with his parents and wife, settling in Beirut where he and his wife started a family. In 2016, he moved to Amsterdam, where he currently resides. His wife and children finally received the paperwork that allowed them to join him. In his photographic works, Imam uses irony and a conceptual approach to respond to the violent situation in Syria, often publishing his work under a pseudonym. After leaving Damascus in late 2012, he began making fictional short films that often focus on the Syrian refugee experience. Individually and with NGOs, he has produced films, photographic projects, and workshops for Syrian refugees in Lebanon

Imam’s newest project, Syrialism, directly confronts the reality of torture experienced by the artist himself, and other Syrian refugees who settled in Lebanon and various European countries.  Like his earlier project Live, Love, Refugee, Imam met and talked with numerous Syrians, this time focusing on those who were abducted. Syrialism recreates painful memories to bring awareness about the psychological and physical torture that persists in the ongoing Syrian civil war. This new series seeks to question the perception of justice, revenge, home, assimilation, religion, and most importantly, how we receive facts and build connections. Omar Imam is both a witness and survivor, whose photographs reveal the human face of suffering.

Michael Koerner

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Richards Heart #4714, 2017 © Michael Koerner

Michael Koerner (b. Okinawa, Japan, 1963) is the oldest of five brothers. Due to genetic abnormalities and cancer, he is the only remaining living son. His brothers’ fates (and potentially his own one day) can be linked to their mother, who was eleven years old on August 9, 1945 when the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. She lived in Sasebo, Japan, 45 miles away from the blast. The long-term effects of severe, acute exposure to gamma radiation led to his mother’s death at an early age, and all of his brothers. Koerner’s work explores his family history and genetics through small tintypes, using photographic chemistry to assimilate the bursts and biochemical fallout from the atom bomb. Koerner is the newest represented artist with CEG and over 30 of his plates are available for viewing at our booth.

 

Ysabel LeMay

Hydra, 2017 © Ysabel LeMay
Hydra, 2017 © Ysabel LeMay

Quebec born Ysabel LeMay found photography later in life, after a successful career working as a graphic artist for prominent advertising agencies. Seeking greater fulfillment, she turned to painting, and in 2002, left the corporate world to pursue painting full time. Eight years later, she turned her attention to photography, garnering significant success in a few short years. Combining her technical expertise with her painterly eye, LeMay creates photographs that challenge our perception of the landscape.

Incubatio, 2018 © Ysabel LeMay
Incubatio, 2018 © Ysabel LeMay

Lemay’s technique is very straightforward, yet extremely time consuming. She photographs flora, birds, tree limbs, flowers, and anything else she finds along her daily walks. Once back in the studio, she assembles all her files into her computer and starts layering images, using hundreds of individual files to construct each final photograph. Balancing color, light and subject, Ysabel LeMay creates pieces that vibrate with an intensity often experienced in dreams. Two of Ysabel’s newest pieces are on view in booth 402.

Serge Najjar

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Reflected Red, 2016 © Serge Najjar

Six years ago Najjar started photographing the interaction of people and architecture in his native Beirut. Influenced by the work of Kazimir Malevich, Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Stella, and Alexander Rodchenko, Najjar took to the streets, focusing his lens on daily routines: construction workers sitting on a building ledge during lunch break, the sharp lines of a high-rise facade, a man looking out an open window, and children sitting on a windowsill. Whether working in Beirut, Munich or other places he visits, Najjar’s vision is unwavering – to show other people what they may not see themselves. As he states:

“There is no such thing as an ideal place to photograph, or an ideal city. Architecture inspires me, but my whole approach towards photography is to focus on what people consider as common… the people I photograph are complete strangers. I never plan where I go and what or who to shoot. My images are faithful to what I see. And every single Saturday morning I am convinced that I will never capture the picture I had the chance to capture the week before…. It is a thin line between the ugly and the beautiful, the ordinary and the extraordinary, between chaos and order.”

As always, you can view the entire booth on our website here. Follow along here, TwitterInstagram, and Facebook for highlights and behind-the-scenes images throughout the week.

The Photography Show, presented by AIPAD
Pier 94, 711 12th Avenue at 55th Street
New York, NY 10019

Hours:

Thursday, April 5 through Saturday, April 7, 2018

VIP Hours: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Public Hours: 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

VIP Hours: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Public Hours: 12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

#AIPAD2018 #ThePhotographyShow @AIPADphoto @edelmangallery

 

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The Photography Show returns to Pier 94!

AIPAD 2018 installation viewCatherine Edelman Gallery is thrilled to be back at Pier 94 for The Photography Show, presented by AIPAD (The Association of International
Photography Art Dealers).
One of the world’s most prestigious annual photography events, The Photography Show is the longest-running and foremost exhibition dedicated to the photographic medium, offering a wide range of museum-quality work, including contemporary, modern, and 19th-century photographs as well as photo-based art, video, and new media. The Vernissage Opening takes place today, Wednesday, April 4 from 5:00 – 9:00 pm (with VIP hours from 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.)!

Screen Shot 2018-04-04 at 12.30.27 PMCEG is proud to be featuring work by Tami Bahat, Daniel Beltrá, Clarissa Bonet, Kate Breakey, Elizabeth Ernst, Omar Imam, Michael Koerner, Ysabel LeMay, Laurent Millet, Serge Najjar, Francesco Pergolesi, Gregory Scott and Bettina von Zwehl. See the work of Booth 402 in full on our website here.

Follow along here, TwitterInstagram and Facebook for highlights and behind-the-scenes images throughout the week. Plan your visit to the fair here, and be sure to visit Booth 402!

The Photography Show, presented by AIPAD
Pier 94, 711 12th Avenue at 55th Street
New York, NY 10019

Hours:

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Vernissage VIP Hours: 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Vernissage Public Hours: 5:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Thursday, April 5 through Saturday, April 7, 2018

VIP Hours: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Public Hours: 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

VIP Hours: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Public Hours: 12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

#AIPAD2018 #ThePhotographyShow @AIPADphoto @edelmangallery

Catherine Edelman Gallery is pleased to announce representation of Michael Koerner!

We are thrilled to present to you the work of our newest represented artist, Michael Koerner (b. Okinawa, Japan, 1963), whose work we will be debuting this week at The Photography Show, presented by AIPAD! Michael is a photographer and chemist, combining the two to create unique collodion photograms on tin plates that range in size from 6 x 4″ to 9 x 6.”

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Coronae #9866, 2017 © Michael Koerner

The artist is the oldest of five brothers. Due to genetic abnormalities and cancer, he is the only remaining living son. His brothers’ fates (and potentially his own one day) can be linked to their mother, who was eleven years old on August 9, 1945 when the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. She lived in Sasebo, Japan, 45 miles away from the blast. The long-term effects of severe, acute exposure to gamma radiation led to his mother’s death at an early age, and all of his brothers. Koerner’s work explores his family history and genetics through small tintypes, using photographic chemistry to assimilate the bursts and biochemical fallout from the atom bomb.

The artist states:

“I am the oldest of five brothers.  The next born son of my parents lived for only several days. The next son was stillborn and the next was miscarried late in the third trimester. The cause of each of these tragedies was traced to genetic abnormalities. My youngest brother, Richard, eventually succumbed to complications associated with two separate bouts of lymphatic cancer. He lived until he was 32 years of age.

There is a tremendous amount of pain and guilt associated with these horrendous endings. It is almost impossible to eliminate or even subdue the feelings that something could have been done differently or avoided. Unfortunately, these feelings are amplified in my family. My mother, Kimiko Takaki, was eleven years old on August 9th, 1945 and living in Sasebo, Japan, which is about 45 miles away from the atomic bomb blast in Nagasaki that fateful day. About half of the 80 thousand deaths from the attack on Nagasaki occurred in the first day, while the other half of the deaths occurred from radiation sickness and burns in the following few months. Realistically, the ultimate death toll is at least ten times higher when you approximate the longterm effects of severe, acute exposure to gamma radiation. My mother and each of her four siblings died of rare genetic disorders and/or cancer at ages much younger than the median life expectancy.

I remain hyper-vigilant towards my own cancer diagnosis and exhibit my own feelings of survivor’s guilt. These feelings and family history and experiences drive my artistic hand.”

See more of Michael’s work on our website here, and on view in our booths at
The Photography Show, April 4 – 8, and at Photo London, May 16 – 20.

New work by our represented artists!

The past few months have proven to be a productive time for many of our represented artists! We are thrilled to show you new photographs from several CEG artists, many of whom will debut recently completed work at The Photography Show presented by AIPAD April 4 – 8, as well as Photo London, May 17 – 20. Read on to learn about the new pieces you can expect to see from Clarissa Bonet, Ysabel LeMay, and Laurent Millet!

Clarissa Bonet

Clarissa Bonet (b. 1986 Tampa) lives and works in Chicago. Her work explores aspects of the urban space in both a physical and psychological context. She received her M.F.A. in photography from Columbia College Chicago in 2012, and her B.S. in Photography from the University of Central Florida. Interested in the physical space of the city and its emotional and psychological impact on the body, she uses the camera to transform the physical space into a psychological one, providing a personal interpretation of the urban landscape. Her work has been exhibited nationally, internationally, and resides in the collections of The Museum of Contemporary Photography’s MPP collection, The South East Museum of Photography, and The Haggerty Museum. Most recently she received a second Chicago Individual Artist Grant and was curated into a group show at the Bauhaus Archive Museum in Berlin, Germany.

Stray Light

Building facades melt into darkness, their architectural details vanish, leaving only glowing windows in a sea of pitch black, like stars in the night sky. Stray Light is an ongoing photographic project aimed at imaging the nocturnal urban landscape. We have all but lost the night for our progress. In its place we have formed a new cosmos, one of vanished surfaces and flecks of light. Carefully constructing each image from multiple photographs, I reform the urban landscape in my own vision – one that seeks to reconstruct the heavens in its absence above the cityscape. Light emanating from each window references a world unknown, evoking a sense of mystery and awe. We no longer look up to the night’s sky with awe. Instead, that is how we look out at the city.

One 42 x 42″ pigment print of “SL.2018.0222 Chicago, 2018” will be on view at The Photography Show. Two 24 x 24″ images from Stray Light, including “SL.2018.0222 Chicago, 2018” will be on view at Photo London.

City Space
The urban space is striking – its tall and mysterious buildings, crowds of anonymous people, the endless sea of concrete. City Space is an ongoing photographic exploration of the urban environment and my perception of it.  I am interested in the physical space of the city and its emotional and psychological impact on the body. These photographs reconstruct mundane events in the city that I have personally experienced or witnessed in public. Stark light, deep shadow and muted color are visual strategies I explore to describe the city.  I use the city as a stage and transform the physical space into a psychological one. The images I create do not represent a commonality of experience but instead provide a personal interpretation of the urban landscape.

Ysabel LeMay

Hydra, 2017 © Ysabel LeMay
Hydra, 2017 © Ysabel LeMay

Ever since the invention of the camera, there are few subjects that attract photographers more than the landscape. Whether photographing from the sky or lying on the grass, photographers continually seek to understand and explore the ground upon which we live and walk. While it seems almost impossible to capture nature in a unique way, Ysabel LeMay defies all odds, creating spectacular images that radiate with color, density and awe.

Ysabel LeMay (b. 1966 Quebec) found photography later in life, after a successful career working as a graphic artist for prominent advertising agencies. Seeking greater fulfillment, she turned to painting, and in 2002, left the corporate world to pursue painting fulltime. Eight years later, she turned her attention to photography, garnering significant success in a few short years. Combining her technical expertise with her painterly eye, LeMay creates photographs that challenge our perception of the landscape.

Lemay’s technique is very straightforward, yet extremely time consuming. She photographs flora, birds, tree limbs, flowers, and anything else she finds along her daily walks. Once back in the studio, she assembles all her files into her computer and starts layering images, using hundreds of individual files to construct each final photograph. Balancing color, light and subject, Ysabel LeMay creates pieces that vibrate with an intensity often experienced in dreams. You will find both “Incubatio, 2018” and “Hydra 2017” at The Photography Show. “Voltige, 2018” and “Hydra, 2017” will be on view at Photo London.

Laurent Millet

L'Astrophile 13, 2017 © Laurent Millet
L’Astrophile 13, 2017 © Laurent Millet

For more than twenty years, Laurent Millet has channeled his innate curiosity to create photographs that question the way objects appear within space and time. Citing R. Buckminster Fuller and Denis Diderot among his influences, Millet creates an artistic vocabulary through metal wire, vineyard posts and barrel hoops – objects prevalent in the coastal town of France in which he resides. L’Astrophile, one of the artist’s latest bodies of work, invokes the imagery of a lunar landing. Two salt prints from this series will be on view at The Photography Show.

There is a rich history of artists constructing environments simply to be photographed and then disassembled. These created realities were prevalent in the 1980s, as works by Sandy Skoglund, Bernard Faucon, Bruce Charlesworth, James Welling and other artists burst onto the scene. All of these artists worked with objects to create a narrative, captured by the camera. Laurent Millet (b. 1968 France) continues to work in this tradition, using various 19th c. printing techniques to magnify his vision.

As he stated in a 2014 interview in L’Oeil de la Photographie: “I felt like I had to take refuge in something that was comforting and reassuring… This idea brought me back to what I did as a child in the countryside when I would play with wood and stones. I rediscovered that pleasure as an adult… Starting with the first things I built, fishing machines, I felt like a world was opening up in which I could really exist. These objects are powered by my personal fictions, my dream of another life. The photograph is proof of that, a record of the moment, a reward.”

Laurent Millet’s work can be seen in numerous publications including his 2014 book, Les Enfantillages Pittoresques (Filigranes Editions) and in major museum collections, including The Art Institute of Chicago, Maison Européenne de la Photographie (Paris), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and Fonds National d’art Contemporain (Paris), among others.

See all the work headed to The Photography Show and Photo London by visiting the Art Fair page of our website here.

 

Dual exhibition openings-Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber: Empire, and Barbara Crane: The Polaroid Years!

Installation of two exhibitions has been underway at Catherine Edelman Gallery this week! We are thrilled to present, Empire, new work by Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber in their second exhibition at the gallery. And in celebration of Barbara Crane’s 90th birthday, we are pleased to present The Polaroid Years, a solo exhibition featuring some of her best known Polaroid pieces from the late 1970s/80s including recent work from 2012. Both shows open March 2 with a reception from 5 pm to 7 pm. The artists will be in attendance. The Polaroid Years runs through April 14, 2018. Empire runs through April 28, 2018.

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Dawn, 2016 © Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber

Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber were both born in the Midwest, in areas known for tornadoes, snowstorms and droughts. As children, these natural disasters became their playground and influenced their first collaborative series, The City. Apocalyptic in nature, this series imagined an interior world without people, with Mother Nature reclaiming her land abused by mankind.

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Sirens, 2017 © Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber

In their newest series, Empire, the duo (now working under the moniker Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber) depict exterior spaces baring the scars of climate change and unexplained disasters. Working in their home/studio, Nix and Gerber transform cardboard, foam, glue and paint into small dioramas that are photographed with an 8 x 10 camera. Often taking up to several months to complete, these large scale models of everyday places – a highway overpass, newspaper boxes on a sidewalk, sink holes in an urban city – fall victim to decay, referencing the effects of pollution and challenging our perceptions of reality, and our responsibilities within it. As they explain:

            “Because the work features a model and not a real place, it creates a safe space to think about larger ideas of disaster. Devoid of people, these spaces become meditative and full of possibilities. Landscapes are more than a visual record of an environment. They also capture the emotional, sometimes spiritual, essence of a place. Empire presents a world transformed by climate uncertainty and a shifting social order as it stumbles towards a new kind of frontier. These places are eerily beautiful but also unsettling in their stillness and silence. Long ago, man entered the landscape and forced nature to his will. Once grand and emblematic of strength and prosperity, these landscapes now appear abused and in decay, and it is uncertain how they will continue to (d)evolve.”

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Arch, 2015 © Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber

Lori Nix and Kathleen Gerber have exhibited their works extensively in Europe and the United States and are in numerous public collections including the Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, TX), George Eastman Museum (Rochester, NY), The Smithsonian American Art Museum (Washington, DC), Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas (Lawrence, KA), Harvard Business School, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), among others. Lori Nix is the recipient of many grants including a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow in photography.

Barbara Crane is recognized as one of the leading conceptual artists to have emerged from The Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. With more than ninety solo exhibitions to date, including seven retrospectives, Crane has solidified her place as one of the most important experimental photographers today. For twenty-eight years she taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago becoming one of the most renowned educators worldwide, while consistently working on her own photography. She retired from teaching in 1995, and is currently working on several book projects.

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Private Views, Mardi Gras, 1982 © Barbara Crane

Many of us have had a love affair with the Polaroid camera. It was the first time we instantly saw what we had photographed. The sound of the film emerging from the camera, the long wait for the image to fully appear… it seemed like magic. Barbara Crane was one of a handful of photographers who was given unlimited access to Polaroid film, allowing her to experiment and push the boundaries of the material. Several of these pieces will be on view, including some of her seminal SX-70 grids that examined repetition and its power to elevate simple patterns into majestic effects. In Polka Dots I, 1980, a grid of red dots play against a yellow backdrop, begging the viewer to see the difference between each frame. In Tucson, 1979, Crane manipulates Polaroid packfilm with a scribe, moving around the emulsion to create an outline of the subjects. And in Private Views, 1981, Crane spent time photographing at Chicago beaches and summer festivals, focusing on the people that make the city so culturally diverse. The Polaroid Years marks the return of Barbara Crane’s work to CEG, where it was first exhibited in 1989, shortly after the gallery opened. We are thrilled to celebrate this milestone with her.

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Tucson, AZ, 1979 © Barbara Crane

Barbara Crane‘s work can be found in numerous collections worldwide including George Eastman Museum (Rochester, NY), The Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL), Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY), Library of Congress (Washington, DC), Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago, IL), Bibliotheque Nationale (Paris, France), Museum of Photography (Thessaloniki, Greece), Amon Carter Museum of American Art (Forth Worth, TX), among others. She is the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts grants in 1974 and 1988, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship in Photography in 1979, as well as many other grants and honors. Her archive will be housed at the Center for Creative Photography (Tucson, AZ), allowing the public and educators an opportunity to study her work in perpetuity.

See each of the exhibitions in full on our website

FINAL WEEK to see Elizabeth Ernst: Shady Grove Nursing Home!

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Don’t miss seeing all new work by Elizabeth Ernst in her third solo show at CEG, Shady Grove Nursing Home
Join us for a special closing reception on the final day of the exhibition, Saturday, February 24, 2018. If you could not attend the opening night reception, this is your last chance to enjoy the exhibition before it closes and speak with the artist. Coffee and doughnuts will be provided from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm.

RSVP on our Facebook event page! You can also see the entire exhibition on our website.

 

 

New work by Sandro Miller!

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Richard Avedon / John Ford, Director, Bel Air, California (April 11, 1972), 2017 © Sandro Miller

You know Illinois native Sandro Miller for his collaboration with John Malkovich to create the homage series Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, which received wide acclaim when it debuted in 2014. The series honors photographs that have impacted Sandro. Pieces include Irving Penn’s photograph of Truman Capote in a corner; Bert Stern’s photographs of Marilyn Monroe; Dorothea Lange’s image of a migrant mother; Richard Avedon’s beekeeper, among many others. The show is still traveling the world and has opened this week in Oslo, where Sandro debuted 20 new homage images: August Saunder’s portraits of 20th-century workers, Man Ray’s surrealist photograph of glass tears, and Richard Avedon’s image of a John Ford, to name a few. Read on for more images and information about the series.

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August Sander / Bricklayer (1928), 2017 © Sandro Miller

At the age of sixteen, upon seeing the work of Irving Penn, Sandro Miller knew he wanted to become a photographer. Mostly self-taught, Sandro relied on books published by many of the great artists canonized in photographic history.  Through their pictures, he learned the art of composition, lighting and portraiture. More than 30 years later, with clients ranging from Forbes, GQ and Esquire, to American Express, Coca-Cola and BMW, Sandro has secured his place as one of the top advertising photographers worldwide.

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Man Ray / Tears (1932), 2017 © Sandro Miller

His success in the commercial world allows him to continue his personal projects, which has included working in Cuba, photographing American blues musicians, various dance troupes, and extended endeavors with John Malkovich, his long time friend and collaborator. Sandro first met Malkovich in the late 1990s, while working on a job for Steppenwolf Theater. More than 20 years later, Sandro and John are still collaborating.

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Irving Penn / Truman Capote, New York (1965), 2017 © Sandro Miller

In 2013, Sandro decided to do a project honoring the men and women whose photographs helped shape his career. After selecting thirty-five images to emulate, Sandro contacted Malkovich, who instantly agreed to participate. When speaking about Malkovich, Sandro states: “John is the most brilliant, prolific person I know. His genius is unparalleled. I can suggest a mood or an idea and within moments, he literally morphs into the character right in front of my eyes. He is so trusting of my work and our process… I’m truly blessed to have him as my friend and collaborator.”

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Patrick Demarchelier / Christy Turlington, British VOGUE, New York (1992), 2017 © Sandro Miller

You can see the entire series on our website here.