New work by Gregory Scott and Ysabel LeMay

Today we continue to introduce the artists we are featuring at Art Miami booth B300. In this post you can read about Ysabel LeMay and Gregory Scott. Both artists have new work premiering at Art Miami!

Ysabel LeMay

Quebec born Ysabel LeMay found photography later in life, after a successful career working as a graphic artist for prominent advertising agencies. Seeking greater fulfillment, she turned to painting, and in 2002, left the corporate world to pursue painting full time. Eight years later, she turned her attention to photography, garnering significant success in a few short years. Combining her technical expertise with her painterly eye, LeMay creates photographs that challenge our perception of the landscape.

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Nebula, 2016 © Ysabel LeMay

Lemay’s technique is very straightforward, yet extremely time consuming. She photographs flora, birds, tree limbs, flowers, and anything else she finds along her daily walks. Once back in the studio, she assembles all her files into her computer and starts layering images, using hundreds of individual files to construct each final photograph. Balancing color, light and subject, Ysabel LeMay creates pieces that vibrate with an intensity often experienced in dreams. She achieves this effect by painting the background of her photographs similarly to our other artist, Gregory Scott. At Art Miami you can see her pieces from the series Gracia.

Cosmea, 2016
Cosmea, 2016 © Ysabel LeMay

Gregory Scott

In 2008, Gregory Scott stunned the art world with his mixed-media video works that combined installation, photography, performance, video and painting. As more and more artists blur the lines between media, Scott has taken the idea to a whole new level, presenting video-based wall pieces that are humorous and poignant, contemplative yet accessible.

Georgia and Alfred, 2016 © Gregory Scott
Georgia and Alfred, 2016 © Gregory Scott

Gregory Scott builds sets in his studio that serve as his subject. In these sets, he records himself performing a variety of scenarios that are then edited into 6-10 minute videos. The sets are then photographed, and the resulting wall piece is a mounted photograph with a cut out for a monitor on which a video plays, and a painted element appears on the photographic surface. In each video, he shows how he constructed the set that he photographed, breaking down the barrier between maker and viewer. All of the hardware is attached to the inside of the frame, making his works self-contained.

 

To see more work from our booth, please visit our website!

Download a complimentary pass for Art Miami on our website here.

November 29 – December 4, 2016
The Art Miami Pavilion
Midtown | Wynwood Arts District
3101 NE 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33137

 

 

 

 

 

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City moments at Art Miami

Today we are introducing Serge Najjar, our most recent represented artist, and Clarissa Bonet a photographer whose first solo show just closed at the gallery and received great reviews and recognition.

Serge Najjar

Five years ago Najjar started photographing the interaction of people and architecture in his native Beirut. Influenced by the work of Kazimir Malevich, Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Stella, and Alexander Rodchenko, Najjar took to the streets, focusing his lens on daily routines: construction workers sitting on a building ledge during lunch break, the sharp lines of a high-rise facade, a man looking out an open window, and children sitting on a windowsill. Whether working in Beirut, Munich or other places he visits, Najjar’s vision is unwavering – to show other people what they may not see themselves. As he states:

Architecture inspires me, but my whole approach towards photography is to focus on what people consider as common… the people I photograph are complete strangers. I never plan where I go and what or who to shoot. My images are faithful to what I see. And every single Saturday morning I am convinced that I will never capture the picture I had the chance to capture the week before…. It is a thin line between the ugly and the beautiful, the ordinary and the extraordinary, between chaos and order.“ Serge Najjar

Rubiks House, 2014 © Serge Najjar
Rubiks House, 2014 © Serge Najjar is currently on view at Art Miami

His first solo show in the US will open at CEG on January 6 and run through February 25, 2017

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Fly Away, 2016 © Serge Najjar is currently on view at Art Miami

Clarissa Bonet

Clarissa Bonet lives and works in Chicago. In 2014, Bonet embarked on a  new project, Stray Light. Bonet photographs once the sun sets, capturing the colorful glows from hotel and apartment windows. Back in her studio, she carefully constructs each image from multiple photographs, transforming the urban cityscape into a constellation, as the mind tries to organize the information presented. Watch Clarissa’s Artist Talk to hear more about her process and work.

SL.2014.1030 Chicago, 2014 © Clarissa Bonet
SL.2014.1030 Chicago, 2014 © Clarissa Bonet is currently on view at Art Miami

Thank you everyone who has visited our booth so far and to those who are still planning to visit, we’ll see you at booth B300!

Download a complimentary pass for Art Miami on our website here.

November 29 – December 4, 2016
The Art Miami Pavilion
Midtown | Wynwood Arts District
3101 NE 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33137

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Everyday Heroes

We are excited to feature work by eight different artists at Art Miami! Today we will highlight two of them whose work shares some common themes.

In our overstimulated, information-saturated world, it’s easy to forget to look around and truly notice our surroundings. It’s so much easier to get lost in an endless scroll of news, sound bytes and social media updates. The work of Francesco Pergolesi and Jan Kaesbach force us to slow down and rediscover the world around us. Whether in Germany, Spain, Greece or Italy, these photographers make us step outside our spinning existence for a moment to realize the simple beauty in our everyday lives.

Francesco Pergolesi

His ongoing series Heroes is devoted to the disappearing landscape that shaped his childhood. Lit from within, his pieces force the viewer to stand inches away, creating an intimate interaction that encourages us to celebrate these everyday heroes.

Francesco Pergolesi was raised in Spoleto, a small Italian village filled with artisan shops and small businesses. Now splitting his time between Spoleto and Barcelona, Pergolesi creates photographic tableaux inspired by memories from his past: narrow cobblestone streets, the sound of a hammer coming from the open door of a shoemaker; the smell of fresh bread from a baker, the steady beat of a sewing machine from an open window, the smell of old paper in a used bookstore. In Pergolesi’s world, these sights and smells drive his art making, as he seeks to preserve the past.
Dino, Roma, 2014 © Francesco Pergolesi
Dino, Roma, 2014 © Francesco Pergolesi

Orfeo, Spoleto, 2015 © Francesco Pergolesi
Orfeo, Spoleto, 2015 © Francesco Pergolesi
Jan Kaesbach

Jan Kaesbach creates portraits of tradespeople that resemble contemporary August Sander’s photographs. The artist makes videos that appear static, yet upon closer examination, an eye twitches, a flame flickers or a hand tremors. Each “moving portrait” is made by seamlessly looping 3,500 still images, which are then played back at standard film speed. The videos last between 3 and 4 minutes, creating a tension between the sitter and the artist, as each subject attempts to remain still. These are quiet pieces that allow an intimate interaction with the viewer. 

Click here to see more work featured at Art Miami.

Download a complimentary pass for Art Miami on our website here.

November 29 – December 4, 2016
The Art Miami Pavilion
Midtown | Wynwood Arts District
3101 NE 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33137

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Art Miami 2016 opens tonight!

It’s time for Art Miami 2016!

Join us in one of the most important annual contemporary art events in the United States, attracting more than 82,000 collectors, curators, museum professionals and art enthusiasts from around the globe annually. In its 27th edition, Art Miami remains committed to showcasing the most important artworks from the 20th and 21st centuries in collaboration with a selection of the world’s most respected galleries.

We are thrilled to be one of the exhibitors and we are looking forward to meeting you at booth B300 during the fair!

Tonight CEG will kick off the opening night with a VIP Preview benefiting the Pérez Art Museum Miami from 5:30 – 10pm! The fair will officially open to the public tomorrow at 11 am.

This year we will be showcasing the work of Julie Blackmon, Clarissa Bonet, Jan Kaesbach, Ysabel LeMay, Serge Najjar, Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison, Francesco Pergolesi and Gregory Scott!

We hope to see you in Miami at Booth: B300!

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Download a complimentary pass for Art Miami on our website here.

November 29 – December 4, 2016
The Art Miami Pavilion
Midtown | Wynwood Arts District
3101 NE 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33137

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New work by Jess T. Dugan

We are thrilled to share three new photographs by Jess T. Dugan. You can see more of her images from her ongoing series To Survive on This Shore on her website.

Preston, 52, East Haven, CT, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Preston, 52, East Haven, CT, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Rosalind, 65, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Rosalind, 65, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Sukie, 59, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Sukie, 59, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
To Survive on This Shore combines photographs of transgender and gender variant people over the age of 50 with interviews about their life experiences in regards to gender, identity, age, and sexuality and provides a nuanced view into the complexities of aging as a transgender person.  The project is made in collaboration with Vanessa Fabbre, a social worker and Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, whose research explores the intersection of LGBTQ issues and gerontology, focusing specifically on transgender and queer perspectives on aging and the life course. By combining our experiences working as a photographer and social worker within the transgender community, we hope to create a project that is simultaneously highly personal and socially relevant.

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Happy Thanksgiving from CEG!

CEG wishes everyone a Happy Thanksgiving filled with amazing food and company!

We are grateful for the talented artists we represent, the support of our collectors and all the friends of the gallery.

Still Life, Mexico, 1992 © Joel-Peter Witkin
Still Life, Mexico, 1992 © Joel-Peter Witkin

CEG will be closed November 24th – November 25th.

We will be open normal business hours for Small Business Saturday November 26th. Have a safe and happy holiday!

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Behind the Scenes with Jerry Spagnoli

Today is History features three contemporary artists who are working with 19th century photographic processes to talk about present day concerns. The show consists of tintypes by Dan Estabrook, orotones by Kate Breakey and daguerreotypes by Jerry Spagnoli.

Over the next few weeks, we will share behind the scenes photos, videos and explanations about how each photographer uses these historical processes. We will start by defining and learning how to make a daguerreotype.

Glass 3-7-12, 2012 © Jerry Spagnoli

“Louis J.M. Daguerre introduced the Daguerreotype process to the public in 1839. The Daguerreotype was the first and only successful photographic process until the 1850s. During the 1840s and 1850s, Daguerreotype plates were commercially produced and easily available. The plates were replaced in the 1860s by the Calotype, which were much cheaper and easier to produce.

Daguerreotypes are created by polishing a silver plate, then exposing it to the vapors of iodine and bromine, which produces silver salts on the surface. The coated plate then goes directly into the camera, where it is exposed to light. After the plate is exposed to light, it is developed by being exposed to heated mercury fumes, and fixed by pouring sodium thiosulfate over the plate.” [Source: Alternative Processes: Daguerreotype with Jerry Spagnoli]

In this video Jerry Spagnoli explains the process of making a daguerreotype.

Jerry Spagnoli (b. 1956 New York City, NY) is credited as today’s preeminent photographer working with the daguerreotype, a polished copper plate treated with mercury vapor. Using this material, Spagnoli has photographed significant historical events, including the horrors of the World Trade Center and the beauty of Times Square on the eve of the Millennium. In his 2012 series, Glasses, Spagnoli tackles the reflective quality of everyday water glasses. As he states, “Ultimately my use of various materials and methods is centered in my desire to make complicated stories out of the everyday world, which is my apparent subject matter. Photography allows me to engage viewers with images and ideas which are filtered through the abstracting apparatus of the camera and woven into the matrix of its rich history.

Install picture of Jerry Spagnoli's work
Install picture of Jerry Spagnoli’s work

You can see all of Jerry’s work includeding Today is History  on our website. They are also on view at the gallery until December 31!

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