New addition to The Chicago Project, Andy Goodwin!

We are excited to introduce our new Chicago Project Artist, Andy Goodwin.

Andy is a commercial and fine art photographer based in Chicago. The following are a few images from his series, Charreada, along with his artist statement. Visit The Chicago Project website to see more of his work.

Charreada 18
Charreada 18, 2015 © Andy Goodwin

The Charreada, predecessor to the American Rodeo.

What began as a curious look into a sport I was unfamiliar with became a fascinating journey into the world of the Charro, a proud culture filled with ordinary Mexican Americans who suit up on the weekends to keep their tradition alive. The time and money spent perfecting these skills handed down from 100 years ago is an incredible spectacle to behold. It’s a dangerous sport and the rewards are often little or nothing with men commonly getting injured. Tradition can be a good enough reason to participate in something but there is a shared importance and comfort here that I think helps these dedicated horsemen stay connected to each other and to a heritage that must seem far away.

Charreada 1, 2015 © Andy Goodwin
Charreada 1, 2015 © Andy Goodwin
charreada-2-2015
Charreada 2, 2015 @ Andy Goodwin

If you are interested in learning more about The Chicago Project or would like information on how to submit, click HERE. The next Chicago Project exhibition, featuring new artists in the project, is scheduled for Summer 2017!

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Call for entries – The Chicago Project

Catherine Edelman Gallery is accepting photography submissions for our ongoing online gallery that focuses on local talent in the Chicagoland area. Images can range from traditional to mixed media photo-based works, and is open to all subject matter. There is no deadline.

ACCEPTING EMAIL SUBMISSIONS ONLY.
Please attach in a single PDF Document (1 image per page):
10 – 20 images (Include Title)

Please attach as Word documents:
Resume
Artist Statement
Title and Price List (Include dimensions and medium of work)
Contact Information (including phone number and email address)

Please send submissions to:
info@edelmangallery.com
Subject: The Chicago Project

This is an online exhibition gallery only. Participation in The Chicago Project does not constitute representation, and does not oblige the artist to the gallery or vice versa. Applicants cannot have representation in the Midwest.

If you have questions, please contact juli@edelmangallery.com
Absolutely no phone calls.

View the full list of The Chicago Project artists on our website.

Migrants8smMigrants 8, 2015 © Krista Svalbonas

My_dream_is_to_realize_who_I_truly_am__2007_
My dream is to realize who I truly am
, 2007 © Tealia Ellis Ritter

Ski-lift__2011_
Skilift, 2011
© Lauren Wilkins

Neverdoll_05Photograph #5, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda

 

Introducing The Chicago Project Artist, Katarzyna Derda!

We are excited to introduce The Chicago Project artist, Katarzyna Derda.

Katarzyna Derda was born and raised in small town in Poland.  She decided to move to the United States in her early 20’s, and that is where she discovered her passion for photography.  In 2006, Katarzyna was accepted to the Daily Herald’s Newspaper Internship.  During this time, photojournalism became a dynamic way of gaining experience and polishing her skills.  After an inspiring year, Katarzyna decided to go back to school to develop her technical skills and look for a new medium of expression.

Photograph #2, 2014
Photograph #2, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda

Katarzyna began photographing and experimenting with different types of prints when she discovered the process of lith printing.  She began her work using dolls and figurines that she felt she had a connection with. Using inanimate objects in her work has been difficult, but at the same time extremely gratifying.  Katarzyna is able to pour her emotions into these images using these dolls to tell the story.

Derda_3
Photograph #2, 2014 in the making

Since 2012, her works have been exhibited in various group exhibitions across the United States and Europe.  In 2014, she was a finalist for her work in some of the most prestigious competitions, such as The Royal Photographic Society 157th International Print Exhibition, the 6th Julia Cameron Award, and the Photographer’s Forum Magazine.  She has received first place in the MIFA; Moscow International Foto Award and Honorable Mention in the IPA; International Photography Award.

Select images from Katarzyna’s Neverdoll series are on view in our current exhibition, The Chicago Project VI: Selections from our Online Gallery running through August 29th.

Derda_4Neverdoll

Neverdoll is a cinematic narrative that uses storytelling as a way to confront emotional states such as melancholy, loneliness and fear. The photographs represent pivotal moments in life’s journey, which is often a mysterious and romantic voyage. With the use of a small doll, with large eyes as the subject, the viewer is encouraged to immerse in themselves into these moments and to view the world differently. The artist, Fantoche, created the doll.

 Neverdoll is ongoing project photographed with a medium format camera and printed in a darkroom using lith process. This process provides me the opportunity to create one of kind photographs that are as delicate and gritty as life itself. The lith prints are then scanned and printed as mounted pigment prints.

Photograph #8, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda
Photograph #8, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda

I think that in some way my projects bring out my inner demons and some emotions buried deep may surface through some photographs.  The projects are not autobiographical and they have their own stories, but some of my feelings and emotions do come through.  I have been told that my work is like ‘painting photographs’.  It was one of the greatest things I’ve heard about my work to this day.

– Katarzyna Derda

Katarzyna Derda added to The Chicago Project!

We are pleased to announce the newest addition to The Chicago Project, Katarzyna Derda. Take a peek at a few of Katarzyna’s images along with her artist statement. Be sure to visit The Chicago Project website to see more of her work!

Photograph #12, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda
Photograph #12, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda

Neverdoll

Neverdoll is a cinematic narrative that uses storytelling as a way to confront emotional states such as melancholy, loneliness and fear. The photographs represent pivotal moments in life’s journey, which is often a mysterious and romantic voyage. With the use of a small doll, with large eyes as the subject, the viewer is encouraged to immerse in themselves into these moments and to view the world differently. The artist, Fantoche, created the doll.

Neverdoll is ongoing project photographed with a medium format camera and printed in a darkroom using lith process. This process provides me the opportunity to create one of kind photographs that are as delicate and gritty as life itself. The lith prints are then scanned and printed as mounted pigment prints.

Photograph #2, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda
Photograph #2, 2014 © Katarzyna Derda

If you are interested in learning more about The Chicago Project or would like information on how to submit, click HERE.

CEG adds new photographer to The Chicago Project!

CEG is pleased to announce a new addition to The Chicago Project: Mehves Lelic. Be sure to visit The Chicago Project online gallery to see more images by all the artists!

Untitled (Gostivar), 2013 © Mehves Lelic
Untitled (Gostivar), 2013 © Mehves Lelic

This series [One] explores the relationship of subjects with their environment with respect to two particular functions: singularity and time. Through the images I document the subject(s) over passing time, or in times far apart, capturing the change in the nature of their singularity or highlighting a counter-factual relationship with their environment by overlaying and masking. In certain frames the multiple subjects are indeed left in a state of loneliness (or singularity) and in others, they have transformed out of such state through the juxtaposition of many co-subjects in the single frame.

Perhaps through these experiments of overlaying and amassing, the photographs aim to reveal a true Notion of singularity that cannot be aided by the eye. The subjects are lonely. The various subjects in the single venue linger in different times; they are one in their own time, in a private space, and their oneness is captured and unchanging in the way that it relates them to their environment.

The individual images are products of documentary work, whereas the final work relates a documentary universe to a conceptual one. The layering introduces variable times in which the subjects and their environment interact in real or manipulated ways, challenging their private space and giving them an enhanced state of plurality.

Isolated Building Studies is published in Japan

Chicago Project photographer, David Schalliol, stopped by the gallery today to give us a copy of his recent publication, Isolated Building Studies. The book was produced by Japanese photography book publisher Utakatado. The 56-page softcover book is 7.5″ x 11.5″ and features 36 photographs from the series.

The book is already available in Asia, and will soon be available in the U.S. without shipping directly from Japan. In the meantime, if you are outside of Asia and would like a copy, you can purchase the book directly from David. The book is $19 (tax included), plus $4 for shipping within the U.S.

Thumbnails of several photographs included in the book.

To see more work by David Schalliol and other Chicago Project artists, click here.

CEG adds new photographers to The Chicago Project

CEG is pleased to announce four new additions to The Chicago Project: Allison Barnes, Elaine Miller, Kevin Shick and Everett C. Williams. Be sure to visit The Chicago Project online gallery to see more images by all four artists.


Allison Barnes

16_Barnes

Neither For Me Honey Nor the Honey Bee
The landscape in which identity is supposed to be grounded is made out of memory and desire, of shifting gestures that point towards what has happened and will happen. There are places that make us, and in some way, we make them. Or means of survival speak of how we value and use the natural world according to our senses, and shows how our own history becomes aligned with the history of a site. The terrain of these stories are built out of personal geographies where we seek comfort and sometimes solitude, where the light is regenerated into three hundred golden bees, calling forth desires that are reconcilable.


Elaine Miller

it holds those memories, 2012

It Would Lose All Purpose
My work explores the themes of death, transience, memory, preservation, and both the frailty and resilience of the human spirit through challenging experiences.

This body of work is my direct reaction to the expected passing of my father, which was quickly followed by the unexpected death of my sister. Immediately following their deaths in 2009, I began photographing the remainder of my family with significant objects symbolic of my dad and sister. I wanted to produce a means for the living to interact with the dead, thus keeping those departed alive.

I also use my work to illustrate the alienation I have felt as well as the fight to recover from the disconnect I built within myself as a coping mechanism. As time has passed, I continue creating portraits of my family to represent the various stages of grief my own psyche has traversed throughout the grieving process. I especially find catharsis in photographing my nieces and nephews, as they themselves are now the symbolic objects my sister and father live through.


Kevin Shick

Crossword, 2013

The Commute
In the series “The Commute” I attempt to capture people as they truly are.  More than candid portraits, these pictures are about identity and the power of habit in creating that identity.  In exploring this hypothesis I found that commuters present a situation containing two elements: the natural self and repetition.

I am interested in un-posed portraits because I hope to understand the true inner self, as opposed to the public mask we often wear.  As Luc Sante wrote in Walker Evans’ book of subway portraits Many Are Called, “time spent commuting is a hiatus from social interaction…you can take off the face you wear for the benefit of others.”

As I observed these commuters over several months, I noticed that certain individuals stood in the same place on the train every day, doing the same thing, often wearing similar clothes and expressions.  Others, whether they were happy, pensive, worried, or self-distracted with a smartphone, seemed to have their actions and outlooks determined less as the result less of conscious choice than of unconscious habit.

By grouping these individuals and their behaviors into grids, I intend to show through repetition and comparison how powerful our daily routines are in shaping our identities.  As Gandhi said, “…Your actions become your habits, Your habits become your values, Your values become your destiny.” 

But I don’t want to imply that we are all simply drones.  Habits help us get through our daily lives, but as James Agee wrote in Many Are Called, “Each [person]…is an individual existence, as matchless as a thumbprint or snowflake. … Each carries in the postures of his body, in his hands, in his face, in the eyes, the signatures of a time and a place in the world.”


Everett C. Williams

Yummy 2, 2013

The combination of language, symbols and color are used to produce photo-based images that discuss cultural, social and political issues.

Photographic and graphic images are digitally combined to produce “OP/POP Art” portraits and images. The mixing and interaction of colors based on the color and value of these images alters the visual perception of the images as they play with the senses.

The use of repetition/variation of these images, allows a number of things to happen. Time is affected when one visual moment becomes many different moments. When each of these moments varies from the last we can explore the narratives that are created with each new picture. The creation of these different narratives allows series to be created interior to pieces or as separate images that can stand alone or be grouped together to give a more complex
narrative.

Yummy series is about the high rate of unprecedented murders in Chicago. It is centered around the image of Robert “Yummy” Sandifer, an 11yr. old killed by the very gang he had killed for. In this series the central figure of Yummy is composed of names of other children who have been killed over the years.


If you are interest in learning about more about The Chicago Project click here. If you would like information on how to submit to the project click here.