Art Miami 2016 opens tonight!

It’s time for Art Miami 2016!

Join us in one of the most important annual contemporary art events in the United States, attracting more than 82,000 collectors, curators, museum professionals and art enthusiasts from around the globe annually. In its 27th edition, Art Miami remains committed to showcasing the most important artworks from the 20th and 21st centuries in collaboration with a selection of the world’s most respected galleries.

We are thrilled to be one of the exhibitors and we are looking forward to meeting you at booth B300 during the fair!

Tonight CEG will kick off the opening night with a VIP Preview benefiting the Pérez Art Museum Miami from 5:30 – 10pm! The fair will officially open to the public tomorrow at 11 am.

This year we will be showcasing the work of Julie Blackmon, Clarissa Bonet, Jan Kaesbach, Ysabel LeMay, Serge Najjar, Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison, Francesco Pergolesi and Gregory Scott!

We hope to see you in Miami at Booth: B300!

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Download a complimentary pass for Art Miami on our website here.

November 29 – December 4, 2016
The Art Miami Pavilion
Midtown | Wynwood Arts District
3101 NE 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33137

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New work by Jess T. Dugan

We are thrilled to share three new photographs by Jess T. Dugan. You can see more of her images from her ongoing series To Survive on This Shore on her website.

Preston, 52, East Haven, CT, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Preston, 52, East Haven, CT, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Rosalind, 65, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Rosalind, 65, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Sukie, 59, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
Sukie, 59, The Bronx, NY, 2016 © Jess T. Dugan
To Survive on This Shore combines photographs of transgender and gender variant people over the age of 50 with interviews about their life experiences in regards to gender, identity, age, and sexuality and provides a nuanced view into the complexities of aging as a transgender person.  The project is made in collaboration with Vanessa Fabbre, a social worker and Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, whose research explores the intersection of LGBTQ issues and gerontology, focusing specifically on transgender and queer perspectives on aging and the life course. By combining our experiences working as a photographer and social worker within the transgender community, we hope to create a project that is simultaneously highly personal and socially relevant.

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Happy Thanksgiving from CEG!

CEG wishes everyone a Happy Thanksgiving filled with amazing food and company!

We are grateful for the talented artists we represent, the support of our collectors and all the friends of the gallery.

Still Life, Mexico, 1992 © Joel-Peter Witkin
Still Life, Mexico, 1992 © Joel-Peter Witkin

CEG will be closed November 24th – November 25th.

We will be open normal business hours for Small Business Saturday November 26th. Have a safe and happy holiday!

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Behind the Scenes with Jerry Spagnoli

Today is History features three contemporary artists who are working with 19th century photographic processes to talk about present day concerns. The show consists of tintypes by Dan Estabrook, orotones by Kate Breakey and daguerreotypes by Jerry Spagnoli.

Over the next few weeks, we will share behind the scenes photos, videos and explanations about how each photographer uses these historical processes. We will start by defining and learning how to make a daguerreotype.

Glass 3-7-12, 2012 © Jerry Spagnoli

“Louis J.M. Daguerre introduced the Daguerreotype process to the public in 1839. The Daguerreotype was the first and only successful photographic process until the 1850s. During the 1840s and 1850s, Daguerreotype plates were commercially produced and easily available. The plates were replaced in the 1860s by the Calotype, which were much cheaper and easier to produce.

Daguerreotypes are created by polishing a silver plate, then exposing it to the vapors of iodine and bromine, which produces silver salts on the surface. The coated plate then goes directly into the camera, where it is exposed to light. After the plate is exposed to light, it is developed by being exposed to heated mercury fumes, and fixed by pouring sodium thiosulfate over the plate.” [Source: Alternative Processes: Daguerreotype with Jerry Spagnoli]

In this video Jerry Spagnoli explains the process of making a daguerreotype.

Jerry Spagnoli (b. 1956 New York City, NY) is credited as today’s preeminent photographer working with the daguerreotype, a polished copper plate treated with mercury vapor. Using this material, Spagnoli has photographed significant historical events, including the horrors of the World Trade Center and the beauty of Times Square on the eve of the Millennium. In his 2012 series, Glasses, Spagnoli tackles the reflective quality of everyday water glasses. As he states, “Ultimately my use of various materials and methods is centered in my desire to make complicated stories out of the everyday world, which is my apparent subject matter. Photography allows me to engage viewers with images and ideas which are filtered through the abstracting apparatus of the camera and woven into the matrix of its rich history.

Install picture of Jerry Spagnoli's work
Install picture of Jerry Spagnoli’s work

You can see all of Jerry’s work includeding Today is History  on our website. They are also on view at the gallery until December 31!

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Francesco Pergolesi creates two new pieces!

We are excited to share two new pieces by Francesco Pergolesi! To see more images from his Hereos series visit our website.

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Furio, Roma 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi
luna-barcelona-2016
Luna, Barcelona, 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi

Heroes

Temple guardians of a little vanishing world, brave and full of passion, they valiantly defend the meeting places for human exchange and relationships, set in unpretentious frames, nibbled by the passing of time.

As survivors on a tiny damaged raft, they face restlessness and greed, on a dangerous sea that doesn’t care about the past and its traditions, smashing together people and principles, obeying the march of progress.

Before it’s too late I shelter memories smelling of yellow paper, and “Ceci n’est pas une pipe,” like a freshly gathered broad bean listening to the gossip of old pilgrims, religiously sitting on green Formica chairs, conserving cloth in dusty trunks and expert hands. They cut cloth in the dead of night, while I preserve pure white clouds made by an ancient pink oven, as old as time; work done by glue and saw, buds and sharp prickles, made by a real good morning and good night!

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New addition to The Chicago Project, Andy Goodwin!

We are excited to introduce our new Chicago Project Artist, Andy Goodwin.

Andy is a commercial and fine art photographer based in Chicago. The following are a few images from his series, Charreada, along with his artist statement. Visit The Chicago Project website to see more of his work.

Charreada 18
Charreada 18, 2015 © Andy Goodwin

The Charreada, predecessor to the American Rodeo.

What began as a curious look into a sport I was unfamiliar with became a fascinating journey into the world of the Charro, a proud culture filled with ordinary Mexican Americans who suit up on the weekends to keep their tradition alive. The time and money spent perfecting these skills handed down from 100 years ago is an incredible spectacle to behold. It’s a dangerous sport and the rewards are often little or nothing with men commonly getting injured. Tradition can be a good enough reason to participate in something but there is a shared importance and comfort here that I think helps these dedicated horsemen stay connected to each other and to a heritage that must seem far away.

Charreada 1, 2015 © Andy Goodwin
Charreada 1, 2015 © Andy Goodwin
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Charreada 2, 2015 @ Andy Goodwin

If you are interested in learning more about The Chicago Project or would like information on how to submit, click HERE. The next Chicago Project exhibition, featuring new artists in the project, is scheduled for Summer 2017!

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Sandro Miller’s new series with John Malkovich – Psychogenic Fugue

In Sandro Miller’s new collaboration with John Malkovich, Psychogenic Fugue, David Lynch’s most iconic scenes and characters come alive! After their successful Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich – Homage to photographic masters (2014) photo project, Sandro directs John Malkovich again, this time as the Log Lady from cult ’90s TV show Twin Peaks; Frank Booth from Blue Velvet and many more, including David Lynch himself!

Elephant Man In His Bedroom, 2016 © Sandro Miller
Elephant Man In His Bedroom, 2016 © Sandro Miller

Sandro also made a short movie hosted by Squarespace, Playing Lynch,  which he calls “A collaborating meditation on the work of David Lynch“. Scenes can be downloaded individually or as a complete 20-minute movie for $10. The donations will go to the David Lynch Foundation. The movie’s soundtrack, The Music of David Lynch, features many artists including Zola Jesus, Sky Ferreira, Duran, Duran.

Dream and Nightmare, 2016 © Sandro Miller
Dream and Nightmare, 2016 © Sandro Miller

Visit CEG’s website to see the entire Psychogenic Fugue series!

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