Preview Catherine Edelman Gallery at Photo London

Screen Shot 2018-05-16 at 9.50.15 AMInstallation is complete and we are ready for today’s preview of Photo London 2018! The invitation-only preview is from 11:00 am – 9:00 p.m (21:00). We are thrilled to be showing the work of Daniel BeltráClarissa BonetOmar ImamMichael KoernerYsabel LeMay, Laurent MilletFrancesco Pergolesi, and Gregory Scott. Whether you are attending todays’s preview, or you plan to visit later this week, we look forward to seeing you at booth G15!

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Follow along with us this week on Cyclopsblog, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook for highlights and behind-the-scenes images from London! Plan your visit to the fair here, and be sure to visit booth G15! Stateside viewers can also see the booth in full on our website here.

Photo London
May 16 – 20, 2018
Somerset House
Strand
London
WC2R 1LA

Thursday 17 May 12:00 – 20:00
Friday 18 May 12:00 – 19:30
Saturday 19 May 12:00 – 19:30
Sunday 20 May 12:00 – 18:30

@edelmangallery @photolondonfair #photolondonfair2018

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CEG arrives in London!

Catherine Edelman Gallery is pleased to be back this year at Photo London! Photo London brings together the world’s leading galleries in a major international photography fair to exhibit the most innovative emerging artists, new work by established masters, and rare vintage pieces. All combined with an innovative public program supported by the LUMA Foundation. The fair is open May 17 – 20, 2018 , with an invitation-only preview tomorrow, Wednesday, May 16 from 11:00 – 9:00 p.m. We are pleased to be featuring the work of Daniel BeltráClarissa BonetOmar ImamMichael KoernerYsabel LeMay, Laurent MilletFrancesco Pergolesi, and Gregory Scott.

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Installation is wrapping up! Stay tuned for final images of our booth ahead of the VIP preview. Follow along with us this week on Cyclopsblog, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook for highlights and behind-the-scenes images from London! Plan your visit to the fair here, and be sure to visit booth G15! Stateside viewers can also see the booth in full on our website here.

Photo London
May 16 – 20, 2018
Somerset House
Strand
London
WC2R 1LA

Thursday 17 May 12:00 – 20:00
Friday 18 May 12:00 – 19:30
Saturday 19 May 12:00 – 19:30
Sunday 20 May 12:00 – 18:30

@edelmangallery @photolondonfair #photolondonfair2018

Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Kelly Catarino

Catherine Edelman Gallery is pleased to present Kelly Catarino, our current Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist! It was a joy for us to watch this exhibition grow day by day last week. The artist’s photographs and immersive installation will be on view through July 7, 2018.

Installation view
Kelly Catarino (b. 1996, CT) is a photographer currently based in Chicago, IL. Her practice uses collage techniques to explore constructed landscapes, perception, and the space between virtual and physical space. She is pursuing her BFA (2018) at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

From the artist: “Garden is an ongoing series that examines the site of the garden and its relationship to construction, escapism, and the desire to feel connected with nature. I use collage as a strategy for imagining constructed landscapes through its ability to simultaneously collapse time, space, and place. My photographs are multi-dimensional amalgamations that mix personal photographs, stock photography, and fake plants to play with variations in resolution between a multitude of images and image sources. These constructions play on photography’s ability to act as both mirror and mediator by creating a hyper-saturated world that attempts to blur the line between reality and fiction.”

Installation viewInstallation viewOpening reception

LINKS:
Kelly’s website
Hyperallergic


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an initiative at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, Ctrl+P provides further exposure for new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the Internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended—in print.

Barbara Diener added to The Chicago Project!

CEG is excited to announce our latest addition to The Chicago Project, Barbara Diener! Born in Germany in 1982, Barbara Diener received her Bachelor of Fine Art in photography from the California College of the Arts and Masters in Fine Art in Photography from Columbia College Chicago. Diener received critical acclaim for her series Sehnschut, and recently debuted a book of her newest series Phantom Power at Daylight Book‘s AIPAD 2018 booth.

Tracing Spirits (American Flag), 2015 © Barbara Diener
Tracing Spirits (American Flag), 2015 © Barbara Diener

From the artist: “In my previous body of work, Sehnsucht, I photographed in small, rural towns that triggered childhood memories. During that process I met and became fascinated with a woman named Kathy. She owns the diner in her town and lives on her husband’s family farm, which is haunted by his ancestors. Her belief in the spectral sparked my own interest in the unexplained and ties back to my ongoing curiosity about religion, spirituality and the human desire to believe that something else happens after we die and that a part of us–the spirit or soul–continues on.

Infrared+Tree
Infared Tree, 2016 © Barbara Diener

“The camera is a crucial tool for most paranormal investigators, so it was a natural step for me to become an amateur ghost hunter myself. Photography has been linked to the spirit world since the 1860s with the popularity of spirit photography and post-mortem portraits. Since its invention photography has lent a sense of immortality to its subjects. In recent years the paranormal has received amplified media attention through numerous ‘reality’ television programs that sensationalize any phenomena for the camera. On the contrary my approach is self-reflective and curious. To make the resulting images I have adopted both traditional and contemporary methods of capturing the invisible, as well as employed my own interpretation of the magical and mystical.”

Hollow+Log
Hollow Log, 2017  © Barbara Diener

Diener’s work has been exhibited at Alibi Fine Art, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Hyde Park Art Center, Hyde Park, David Weinberg Gallery, New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe, Griffin Museum of Photography, Invisible Dog Gallery, Lillstreet Art Center, Riverside Art Center, Pingyao Photo Festival, The Arcade, Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, Darkroom Gallery, and Project Basho among others. Diener’s photographs are part of several private and institutional collections including the New Mexico Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Photography.

The artist has participated in highly ambitious artist residency programs, including the Fields Project in Oregon, IL and ACRE in Steuben, WI, as well as HATCH Projects 2015-2016 through the Chicago Artist Coaltition.

Diener is a winner of Flash Forward 2013, the recipient of a Follett Fellowship at Columbia College Chicago and was awarded the Albert P. Weisman Award in 2012 and 2013. In addition, Diener received an Individual Artist Grant from the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Events in 2015. She is the Collection Manager in the Department of Photography at the Art Institute of Chicago and teaches photography at Oakton Community College and at the School of the Art Institute.

See more of Barbara Diener’s work on the Chicago Project website here.

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The Chicago Project is an online gallery initiative by Catherine Edelman Gallery, devoted to new and established photographers in the Chicago area, who we feel deserve recognition. It is our hope to expose local talent to a wider audience and we plan on adding photographers as we find them. If you are interested in learning more about the Chicago Project or would like information on how to submit, click HERE.

Catherine Edelman Gallery representing Garrett O. Hansen!

Catherine Edelman Gallery is excited to announce our newest represented artist, Garrett O. Hansen! You may recall seeing Garrett’s Chicago-specific work titled Memorial, as well as his Silhouettes series of laser-cut mirrors in our summer 2017 exhibition, Targeted. Garrett O. Hansen (b. 1979, NYC) graduated from Grinnell College, where he studied economics and political science. He completed his MFA in photography at Indiana University and has taught at several universities in the United States and in Asia; he is now an Assistant Professor of Photography at the University of Kentucky. Garrett has had numerous solo and group exhibitions in the United States, Europe, Indonesia, and Japan.

“Roughly 40% of US households have a gun and there are enough guns – approximately 300 million – to arm nearly every man, woman, and child in the country.”

At the core of The Void series is a desire to consider these facts and to create a set of images that speaks to their implications. Each of the images is created from individual bullet holes. While shooting is fundamentally a destructive act, by bringing these holes into the darkroom, enlarging them and then processing and printing the results, the artist is able to balance this destruction with creation. The viewer is presented with images that speak to the sublime – they are both attractive and terrifying at the same time. In many ways this reflects our own opinions of guns in America, a country where the debate between rights and controls continues to rage.

While The Void series deals with the power of the single bullet, the Silhouette series engages the broader culture of guns in America. Garrett visits a local gun range and collect the cardboard backings that are used behind their standard target. The targets depict an unarmed man’s silhouette, a highly common target throughout civilian and police gun ranges. Each shooter is presented with a fresh target, while the backings slowly erode from the thousands of rounds shot at the unarmed man. The groupings that one most often sees are in the chest and head areas. The artist collects the pieces of cardboard and bring them into the darkroom, where he makes full sized contact prints of them.  These prints are then scanned and form the basis for the final pieces. The final pieces are made of mirrored plexiglass and are one-to-one replicas of the original cardboard backings. As viewers approach the piece, they see their own reflections hollowed out by the countless bullets.

The third component to this ongoing project is comprised of bullets that have been collected from gun ranges. Each bullet, sculpted by impact with a ballistic steel wall, takes on a dramatic new form. The contorted shapes speak to the inherent violence in shooting and the transformation of each fired bullet from a sleek projectile into a twisted shard of lead. As with The Void series, this work deals with the complex connections between destruction and creation.

The latest component to this ongoing series is entitled Memorial. Each piece documents gun deaths in a particular place and for a particular length of time. The first incarnation of this work entitled Memorial – Kentucky, 2016 is comprised of twelve panels. Each panel represents a single month in Kentucky and records every homicide involving a gun that occurred during that month. This work acknowledges and lays bare the heavy price of having a heavily armed civilian population.

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Installation view, comparing the city of Chicago to the state of Kentucky.

You can read an in-depth article about Garrett from the The Trace in conjunction with Targeted, and watch Catherine speak with Garrett in his July 2017 Artist Talk below.

 

Catherine Edelman Gallery is pleased to announce representation of Michael Koerner!

We are thrilled to present to you the work of our newest represented artist, Michael Koerner (b. Okinawa, Japan, 1963), whose work we will be debuting this week at The Photography Show, presented by AIPAD! Michael is a photographer and chemist, combining the two to create unique collodion photograms on tin plates that range in size from 6 x 4″ to 9 x 6.”

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Coronae #9866, 2017 © Michael Koerner

The artist is the oldest of five brothers. Due to genetic abnormalities and cancer, he is the only remaining living son. His brothers’ fates (and potentially his own one day) can be linked to their mother, who was eleven years old on August 9, 1945 when the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. She lived in Sasebo, Japan, 45 miles away from the blast. The long-term effects of severe, acute exposure to gamma radiation led to his mother’s death at an early age, and all of his brothers. Koerner’s work explores his family history and genetics through small tintypes, using photographic chemistry to assimilate the bursts and biochemical fallout from the atom bomb.

The artist states:

“I am the oldest of five brothers.  The next born son of my parents lived for only several days. The next son was stillborn and the next was miscarried late in the third trimester. The cause of each of these tragedies was traced to genetic abnormalities. My youngest brother, Richard, eventually succumbed to complications associated with two separate bouts of lymphatic cancer. He lived until he was 32 years of age.

There is a tremendous amount of pain and guilt associated with these horrendous endings. It is almost impossible to eliminate or even subdue the feelings that something could have been done differently or avoided. Unfortunately, these feelings are amplified in my family. My mother, Kimiko Takaki, was eleven years old on August 9th, 1945 and living in Sasebo, Japan, which is about 45 miles away from the atomic bomb blast in Nagasaki that fateful day. About half of the 80 thousand deaths from the attack on Nagasaki occurred in the first day, while the other half of the deaths occurred from radiation sickness and burns in the following few months. Realistically, the ultimate death toll is at least ten times higher when you approximate the longterm effects of severe, acute exposure to gamma radiation. My mother and each of her four siblings died of rare genetic disorders and/or cancer at ages much younger than the median life expectancy.

I remain hyper-vigilant towards my own cancer diagnosis and exhibit my own feelings of survivor’s guilt. These feelings and family history and experiences drive my artistic hand.”

See more of Michael’s work on our website here, and on view in our booths at
The Photography Show, April 4 – 8, and at Photo London, May 16 – 20.

Dual exhibition openings-Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber: Empire, and Barbara Crane: The Polaroid Years!

Installation of two exhibitions has been underway at Catherine Edelman Gallery this week! We are thrilled to present, Empire, new work by Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber in their second exhibition at the gallery. And in celebration of Barbara Crane’s 90th birthday, we are pleased to present The Polaroid Years, a solo exhibition featuring some of her best known Polaroid pieces from the late 1970s/80s including recent work from 2012. Both shows open March 2 with a reception from 5 pm to 7 pm. The artists will be in attendance. The Polaroid Years runs through April 14, 2018. Empire runs through April 28, 2018.

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Dawn, 2016 © Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber

Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber were both born in the Midwest, in areas known for tornadoes, snowstorms and droughts. As children, these natural disasters became their playground and influenced their first collaborative series, The City. Apocalyptic in nature, this series imagined an interior world without people, with Mother Nature reclaiming her land abused by mankind.

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Sirens, 2017 © Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber

In their newest series, Empire, the duo (now working under the moniker Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber) depict exterior spaces baring the scars of climate change and unexplained disasters. Working in their home/studio, Nix and Gerber transform cardboard, foam, glue and paint into small dioramas that are photographed with an 8 x 10 camera. Often taking up to several months to complete, these large scale models of everyday places – a highway overpass, newspaper boxes on a sidewalk, sink holes in an urban city – fall victim to decay, referencing the effects of pollution and challenging our perceptions of reality, and our responsibilities within it. As they explain:

            “Because the work features a model and not a real place, it creates a safe space to think about larger ideas of disaster. Devoid of people, these spaces become meditative and full of possibilities. Landscapes are more than a visual record of an environment. They also capture the emotional, sometimes spiritual, essence of a place. Empire presents a world transformed by climate uncertainty and a shifting social order as it stumbles towards a new kind of frontier. These places are eerily beautiful but also unsettling in their stillness and silence. Long ago, man entered the landscape and forced nature to his will. Once grand and emblematic of strength and prosperity, these landscapes now appear abused and in decay, and it is uncertain how they will continue to (d)evolve.”

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Arch, 2015 © Lori Nix / Kathleen Gerber

Lori Nix and Kathleen Gerber have exhibited their works extensively in Europe and the United States and are in numerous public collections including the Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, TX), George Eastman Museum (Rochester, NY), The Smithsonian American Art Museum (Washington, DC), Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas (Lawrence, KA), Harvard Business School, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), among others. Lori Nix is the recipient of many grants including a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow in photography.

Barbara Crane is recognized as one of the leading conceptual artists to have emerged from The Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. With more than ninety solo exhibitions to date, including seven retrospectives, Crane has solidified her place as one of the most important experimental photographers today. For twenty-eight years she taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago becoming one of the most renowned educators worldwide, while consistently working on her own photography. She retired from teaching in 1995, and is currently working on several book projects.

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Private Views, Mardi Gras, 1982 © Barbara Crane

Many of us have had a love affair with the Polaroid camera. It was the first time we instantly saw what we had photographed. The sound of the film emerging from the camera, the long wait for the image to fully appear… it seemed like magic. Barbara Crane was one of a handful of photographers who was given unlimited access to Polaroid film, allowing her to experiment and push the boundaries of the material. Several of these pieces will be on view, including some of her seminal SX-70 grids that examined repetition and its power to elevate simple patterns into majestic effects. In Polka Dots I, 1980, a grid of red dots play against a yellow backdrop, begging the viewer to see the difference between each frame. In Tucson, 1979, Crane manipulates Polaroid packfilm with a scribe, moving around the emulsion to create an outline of the subjects. And in Private Views, 1981, Crane spent time photographing at Chicago beaches and summer festivals, focusing on the people that make the city so culturally diverse. The Polaroid Years marks the return of Barbara Crane’s work to CEG, where it was first exhibited in 1989, shortly after the gallery opened. We are thrilled to celebrate this milestone with her.

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Tucson, AZ, 1979 © Barbara Crane

Barbara Crane‘s work can be found in numerous collections worldwide including George Eastman Museum (Rochester, NY), The Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL), Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY), Library of Congress (Washington, DC), Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago, IL), Bibliotheque Nationale (Paris, France), Museum of Photography (Thessaloniki, Greece), Amon Carter Museum of American Art (Forth Worth, TX), among others. She is the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts grants in 1974 and 1988, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship in Photography in 1979, as well as many other grants and honors. Her archive will be housed at the Center for Creative Photography (Tucson, AZ), allowing the public and educators an opportunity to study her work in perpetuity.

See each of the exhibitions in full on our website