Portraiture on view in Miami

 

Alanna Airitam
When Alanna Airitam (b. 1971, Queens, NY) was studying the history of art, she noticed the absence of black people in the history of Western art. This exclusion is familiar to many dark-skinned people who are used to seeing themselves represented in paintings and films as domestic workers, slaves or barbarians. By inviting African Americans to pose in the style of classic Dutch portraiture, Airitam reclaims art history, shining a light on the racial disparity in her series, The Golden Age. Titling her images after places in Harlem — Saint Sugar Hill, Saint Minton and Saint Lenox — the artist pays homage to the Harlem Renaissance, which opened doors for many young African Americans working today. It is a powerful series that celebrates black identity while highlighting the racial divide that exists throughout art history.

Endia Beal
Endia Beal (b. 1985, Winston-Salem, NC) focuses her camera on how African American women are perceived in the corporate world based on their physical appearance. As a young black woman in a mostly white dominated corporate job, Beal knew people talked behind her back about her hair, which did not conform to their definition of beauty. Now, as a professor at Winston Salem State University, Beal tackles the stereotypes that her students and other black women face when they do not fit the corporate mold. Am I What You’re Looking For? poses black women in front of a photographic backdrop of a typical office setting, wearing an outfit they find suitable for work. Through this work, Beal challenges the viewer to look at their own biases or stereotypes as they view the photographs.

Medina Dugger
Medina Dugger (b. 1983, Corpus Christi, TX) pays homage to Nigerian photographer J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere, whose 40 year black and white photographic study of African women’s hairstyles set the standard for the celebration of black hair culture. African hair braiding methods date back thousands of years and Nigerian hair culture is a rich and often extensive process, which begins in childhood. The methods and variations have been influenced by social/cultural patterns, historical events and globalization. Hairdos range from being purely decorative to conveying deeper, more symbolic understandings, revealing social status, age and tribal/family traditions. In her Lagos studio, Dugger pays homage to historical and imagined hairstyles, honoring Ojeikere’s work through a contemporary lens in her series Chroma: An Ode to J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere.

 

You can see work from all the artists featured at booth #211 here.
For more information on the fair, visit www.artmiami.com.

Catherine Edelman Gallery at Art Miami 2018

Booth #211

The Art Miami Pavilion
One Miami Herald Plaza @ NE 14th Street
Downtown Miami
On Biscayne Bay between the Venetian & Macarthur Causeways

Show Hours:

VIP Preview
Tuesday, December 4
5:30pm – 10pm

Thursday, December 6 11am – 8pm
Friday, December 7 11am – 8pm
Saturday, December 8 11am – 8pm
Sunday, December 9 11am – 6pm

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Debuting new work at Art Miami

We would like to extend a big thank-you to everyone who joined us yesterday for the VIP Preview of Art Miami! Opening night is always a great time spent talking about our featured artists. The first day of public hours begins today at 11:00 am. You will discover new work by three of our featured artists, as well as new bodies of work by our represented artists. Read on to learn more about Michael Koerner, Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison, and Gregory Scott!

Michael Koerner

DNA-7797L-7801R,-2018
DNA #7797L – #7801R, 2018 © Michael Koerner

Michael Koerner (Okinawa, Japan, 1963) is the oldest of five brothers. Due to genetic abnormalities and cancer, he is the only remaining living son. His brothers’ fates (and potentially his own one day) can be linked to their mother, who was eleven years old on August 9, 1945 when the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. She lived in Sasebo, Japan, 45 miles away from the blast. The long-term effects of severe, acute exposure to gamma radiation led to his mother’s death at an early age, and all of his brothers. Koerner’s work explores his family history and genetics through small tintypes, using photographic chemistry to assimilate the bursts and biochemical fallout from the atom bomb.

Koerner’s 6 x 8” tintypes seduce the viewer with glistening deep blacks, metallic silvers, and odd green, yellow and blue hues, to talk about disease. By blowing through a straw, or dripping chemicals from an eyedropper onto tin plates, Koerner manipulates collodion to create sunbursts, explosions, amorphous shapes, and double helixes, all of which reference his family history. In Waterfalls we see vibrant blue chemical drippings, reminiscent of pieces by the 18th c. Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai; in Phases small balls float across the sky, resembling shooting stars; in Finger Prints, the repetitive imprint of the artists fingertips suggests a medical scan or disease.

Michael Koerner started showing his tintypes less than two years ago, and is part of numerous collections including the Sir Elton John Collection (Atlanta, GA), Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, (Kansas City, MO) and the Norton Museum of Art (West Palm Beach, FL). We are honored to present his first solo exhibition and believe it is a fitting way to close out our 31 years in River North.

Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison

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Chasing Birds, 2018 © Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison

Act Without Words

We have focused on a key inspirational source of our work over many years: Performance Stills and Stills from Cinema.

Our work has always relied heavily on research. Key within that research has been perusing film and performance stills of works ranging from Brecht, Beckett, Cunningham, Rauschenberg, Postmodern Dance, Experimental theater and Cinema. We find viewing stills to be central to igniting our creative engines. These images allow us to Ponder the totality of the past performance, without knowing the fullness of the event. It is like a spark of magic. This incompleteness allows us to begin the dreaming process. Within this dreaming we find our own story, our own meaning. And from that point new images form.

These images are constructed with that in mind. Rather than creating a complete narrative, we created these images attempting to embody that electric charge we respond to in performance stills. Our intent is for the viewer to experience these images as awakenings to ponder the scenes much like we imagine while viewing performance stills.

Each image in the series is one-of-kind.

Gregory Scott

Basqiuat Dreams, 2018
Basquiat Dreams, 2018 © Gregory Scott

This year at Art Miami we are debuting a new piece from Gregory Scott titled, Basquiat Dreams. Gregory tackles Jean-Michel Basquiat, who first gained recognition as part of a duo graffiti team named SAMO, popular from 1977-1980. He went from being homeless at the age of 17 to major success within a few years. His fame is often credited to his blending of text and image, which tackled racism, classism, colonialism and celebrity, while staying true to his street art roots. The result was more than 600 paintings and 1500 drawings, all done before his untimely death at the age of 27.

Many references to Basquiat’s life and works can be seen in Basquiat Dreams. The video starts with numbers, which reference the date of his birth and death, and the highest price paid for one of his paintings. From there, Scott eludes to SAMO, skulls, figures and markings, among other known Basquiat symbols. The result is a poetic and spirited homage to an artist whose genius was cut short, but lives on as an inspiration.

Basquiat Dreams, 2018 is a framed 30½” x 40″ pigment print, oil on panel, and 4k UHD video (7 min 45 sec), made in an Ed. of 10.

You can see work from all the artists featured at booth #211 here.
For more information on the fair, visit www.artmiami.com.

Catherine Edelman Gallery at Art Miami 2018

Booth #211

The Art Miami Pavilion
One Miami Herald Plaza @ NE 14th Street
Downtown Miami
On Biscayne Bay between the Venetian & Macarthur Causeways

Show Hours:

Wednesday, December 5 11am – 8pm
Thursday, December 6 11am – 8pm
Friday, December 7 11am – 8pm
Saturday, December 8 11am – 8pm
Sunday, December 9 11am – 6pm

CEG at Art Miami

In its 29th edition, Art Miami maintains a preeminent position in America’s modern and contemporary art fair market and is globally recognized as a primary destination for the acquisition of the most important works from the 20th and 21st centuries. The VIP Preview, sponsored by Christie’s International Real Estate and benefiting the Perez Art Museum Miami, takes place tonight from 5:30 – 10:00 pm. We are pleased to showcase the work of Alanna Airitam, Endia Beal, Marina Black, Clarissa Bonet, Medina Dugger, Pete Jacobs, Michael Koerner, Laurent Millet, Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison and Gregory Scott.

You can see work from all the artists featured at booth #211 here.
For more information on the fair, visit www.artmiami.com.

Catherine Edelman Gallery at Art Miami 2018

Booth #211

The Art Miami Pavilion
One Miami Herald Plaza @ NE 14th Street
Downtown Miami
On Biscayne Bay between the Venetian & Macarthur Causeways

Show Hours:

VIP Preview
Tuesday, December 4
5:30pm – 10pm

Wednesday, December 5 11am – 8pm
Thursday, December 6 11am – 8pm
Friday, December 7 11am – 8pm
Saturday, December 8 11am – 8pm
Sunday, December 9 11am – 6pm

Michael Koerner: My DNA opens tomorrow!

We are thrilled to end the 2018-year with work by newly discovered artist Michael Koerner, whose tintypes have stunned the art world. My DNA opens November 2 and runs through December 22, 2018. This will be the final show in our River North location. After 31 years in the same building, we are moving to 1637 W. Chicago Avenue, to join fellow gallerists in West Town.

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There will be an opening reception on Friday, November 2, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. The artist will be in attendance.

This Saturday, November 3 at noon, we will host a discussion in the gallery between the artist, Saira Chambers, Director of the Japanese Culture Center, and Professor Yuki Miyamoto, a nuclear ethicist at DePaul University. The discussion will explore how contemporary artists like Koerner tackle the concept of Gaman (我慢), creating a conflict between his cultural heritage and his need to examine the effects that the atomic bomb had on his family. This event is free and open to the public. More information and a link to RSVP here!

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On August 9, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the town of Nagasaki, a short distance from the home of Michael Koerner’s mother. The chemical fallout from the bomb instantly killed tens of thousands of people, and left many more reeling from its effects for the rest of their lives. Koerner’s family is just one example of the devastation that chemical warfare had during World War II.

Shoreline #7415, 2018
Shoreline #7415, 2018 © Michael Koerner

Michael Koerner (b. Okinawa, Japan, 1963) is the oldest of five brothers. Due to genetic deformities resulting from cancer, he is the only remaining living sibling. His brothers’ fates (and potentially his own one day) can be linked to their mother, who was eleven years old on that ill-fated August day. She lived in Sasebo, Japan, 45 miles away from the blast. The long-term effects of gamma radiation led to his mother’s death at an early age, and all of his brothers. Koerner’s work explores his family history and genetics through small tintypes, using photographic chemistry to assimilate the bursts and biochemical fallout from the atom bomb. With a family history of various cancers, it is no wonder Koerner became an organic chemist, currently teaching at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Screen Shot 2018-11-01 at 3.14.41 PM

Koerner’s 6 x 8” tintypes seduce the viewer with glistening deep blacks, metallic silvers, and odd green, yellow and blue hues, to talk about disease. By blowing through a straw, or dripping chemicals from an eyedropper onto tin plates, Koerner manipulates collodion to create sunbursts, explosions, amorphous shapes, and double helixes, all of which reference his family history. In Waterfalls we see vibrant blue chemical drippings, reminiscent of pieces by the 18th c. Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai; in Phases, small balls float across the sky, resembling shooting stars; in Finger Prints, the repetitive imprint of the artists fingertips suggests a medical scan or disease.  As he states:

“I am the oldest of five brothers.  The next born son of my parents lived for only several days. The next son was stillborn and the next was miscarried late in the third trimester. The cause of each of these tragedies was traced to genetic abnormalities. My youngest brother, Richard, eventually succumbed to complications associated with two separate bouts of lymphatic cancer. He lived until he was 32 years of age. There is a tremendous amount of pain and guilt associated with these horrendous endings. It is almost impossible to eliminate or even subdue the feelings that something could have been done differently or avoided.

About half of the 80 thousand deaths from the attack on Nagasaki occurred in the first day, while the other half of the deaths occurred from radiation sickness and burns in the following few months. Realistically, the ultimate death toll is at least ten times higher when you approximate the long-term effect of severe, acute exposure to gamma radiation. My mother and each of her four siblings died of rare genetic disorders and/or cancer at ages much younger than the median life expectancy. I remain hyper-vigilant towards my own cancer diagnosis and exhibit my own feelings of survivor’s guilt. These feelings, and family history and experiences, drive my artistic practice.”

Screen Shot 2018-11-01 at 3.14.06 PM

Michael Koerner started showing his tintypes less than two years ago, and is part of numerous collections including the Sir Elton John Collection (Atlanta, GA), Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, (Kansas City, MO) and the Norton Museum of Art (West Palm Beach, FL). We are honored to present his first solo exhibition and believe it is a fitting way to close out our 31 years in River North. We opened the gallery with Nan Goldin’s Ballad of Sexual Dependency, a visual diary of the artist’s struggle with love, addiction, heartache and friendship. And we say thank you to River North with the work of a newly discovered photographer, Michael Koerner, who teaches us about our past and its ramifications, through visually stunning pieces of art. We look forward to welcoming the public to our new space at 1637 W. Chicago Ave., in March 2019.

The entire show can be seen on our website here.

New work by Francesco Pergolesi!

Leo,-Greece,-2018
Leo, Greece, 2018 © Francesco Pergolesi

Two years ago marked the American debut of work by photographer Francesco Pergolesi, who was raised in Spoleto, an Italian village filled with artisan shops and small businesses. His series, Heroes, features work inspired by the people and places from his childhood that are slowly disappearing: the watchmaker fixing old time pieces; the frame shop where hand-milled frames line the walls; and the local cobbler whose walls are covered with leather hides. Working in collaboration with the shopkeepers, Pergolesi presents narratives that honor the past, while preserving the present. Work from Heroes is not only printed and framed traditionally, but also presented as small boxes lit from within by a LED light.

Screen Shot 2018-10-20 at 2.21.47 PM
Detail view of “Antó, 2018” © Francesco Pergolesi

The artist was born in Venice in 1975. He lives and works between Spoleto, Rome and Barcelona.After finishing his law degree, he dedicated himself entirely to photography. He is an artist-photographer whose work explores the territory of memory. Every single shot is a kind of a theater scene. His subjects are revealed in the lights and shadows reminiscent of Flemish paintings. As he states:

“When I was a child I used to walk free exploring my village streets. I remember I loved to spend time in the little cobbler or the grocery where my Grandmother sent me to shop. Time seemed to be extended and let me feel the sense of freedom. I grew up loving neighborhoods where human relationships were the center of life. I realized early on those places were disappearing as pushed by a mysterious force, a new era was coming.”

Era,-Greece,-2018
Era, Greece, 2018 © Francesco Pergolesi

Francesco Pergolesi sees himself as a guardian of a vanishing world where people congregate to talk about families and daily activities. Every Hero unearths a person from his past…and every photograph becomes a new theater set, inspiring him every day, as he continues to wander the streets looking for a connection.

Pepi,-Barcelona,-2018
Pepi, Barcelona, 2018 © Francesco Pergolesi

See more work by the artist, and interviews with Francesco on our website, here.

New additions to The Chicago Project: Lindsey Higgins and Shawn Rowe!

Catherine Edelman Gallery is excited to have added Lindsey Higgins and Shawn Rowe to our online gallery, The Chicago Project. Read more about these artists’ respective series  and see a selection of images below.

Lindsey Higgins
Lindsey Higgins (b. 1994) lives and works in Chicago, IL. She attended Columbia College Chicago and earned a BA with a discipline in fine art photography.

Lindsey is most influenced by the potential of memories, specifically, how such memories shape one’s experience with their own unique take on the world. Her most current project Empty Spaces speaks to the power of theses senses. Much like an individual’s sense of smell, her interest in color and the ways that it speaks differently to all has assisted her over the past three years to build her series Empty Spaces.

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25444c, 2018 © Lindsey Higgins


Empty Spaces

Empty Spaces is composed of a collection of images exploring how light directly relates to the way separate spaces are seen. Each space contains a unique color palette as well as interesting formal qualities, such as the misperception of space and depth. I have furthered this observation by pairing each empty space with an image that mimics the color palette already represented.

screen-shot-2018-10-13-at-4-19-02-pm.png
172331, 2017 © Lindsey Higgins

A hexadecimal number titles each piece. The hex values are six-digit combinations of letters and numbers that represent three separate values, the red, blue, and green components of each image. By describing the work using hex values, each set of images is precisely named. With this knowledge in mind, audiences are able to interact with the work to later find the specific color they enjoyed most through referencing the hex value.

Screen Shot 2018-10-13 at 4.27.37 PM.png
d8b69a, 2018 © Lindsey Higgins

I have presented Empty Spaces as a series of diptychs as it is relevant to view the work in two parts. Diptychs allow the audience to observe different perspectives on the same subject. In this case, each subject predominantly shares color values. My wish is to remind others of a specific moment or space in their life through viewing my work. By combining photographs from different environments, one that is heavily spatial and one that contains natural substances or traces thereof, I hope to take a closer look into the details of these spaces.

 

Shawn Rowe
Shawn Rowe (b. 1985) is a Chicago based artist and curator exploring the complexities of gender and social constructs through portraiture.  His long form approach allows him to embed with his subjects for months or years in order to understand them as complex beings.  Shawn’s work has been exhibited and featured throughout the United States and internationally including the Photographic Center Northwest, Aint-Bad and Der Greif.  Shawn is also the Assistant Editor of SKYLARK EDITIONS, a non-profit book publisher in Chicago, IL. Shawn received an MFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago and holds a BA in Psychology from Southern New Hampshire University.

Screen Shot 2018-10-13 at 4.16.48 PM
Untitled (hand on neck), 2018
V

In my work a quiet repose emerges, where moments of introspection grow long while light and atmosphere become tactile. Landscape imagery punctuates this self-portrait, serving as metaphor to discuss the symbiosis between nature and the body. characterizes this relationship as both internal and external, with each body leaving marks upon the other. The power structures that support this dialogue manifest as visual interruptions in the intervening space between reflection and perception. In this work I create space to discuss a range of definitions of masculinity, sexuality and gender in order to articulate acceptance and resolve.

 

The title describes the ambiguity of the project itself. In ancient times, V was used interchangeably with the letter U. V is the Roman Numeral for five and embodies a downward pointing arrow. For this work, the two lines that create the letter V intersect where the body and the environment exchange forces. These images represent a visualization of this conversation. The installation is emblematic of the work in that the scale, distance and dimensions are variable. Like the letter V, I am asking my viewer to bring their own associations and meanings to the images and the body of work as a whole.

__________________________________________________________

The Chicago Project is an online gallery initiative by Catherine Edelman Gallery, devoted to new and established photographers in the Chicago area, who we feel deserve recognition. It is our hope to expose local talent to a wider audience and we plan on adding photographers as we find them. If you are interested in learning more about the Chicago Project or would like information on how to submit, click HERE.

Opening tonight: How do you see me? Photographs by Alanna Airitam, Endia Beal and Medina Dugger

We are thrilled to open the fall season with a compelling show by three women who confront the way African Americans are perceived in art, the work place, and through their physical appearance. How do you see me? features photographs by Alanna Airitam, Endia Beal and Medina Dugger. Each artist’s work will be presented in a unique and non-traditional manner.

The show opens this evening, September 7 and runs through October 27, 2018. Alanna Airitam and Endia Beal will be at the opening reception tonight from 5:00 to 8:00 pm.

When Alanna Airitam (b. 1971, Queens, NY) was studying the history of art, she noticed the absence of black people in the history of Western art. This exclusion is familiar to many dark-skinned people who are used to seeing themselves represented in paintings and films as domestic workers, slaves or barbarians. By inviting African Americans to pose in the style of classic Dutch portraiture, Airitam reclaims art history, shining a light on the racial disparity in her series, The Golden Age. Titling her images after places in Harlem — Saint Sugar Hill, Saint Minton and Saint Lenox — the artist pays homage to the Harlem Renaissance, which opened doors for many young African Americans working today. It is a powerful series that celebrates black identity while highlighting the racial divide that exists throughout art history.

Endia Beal (b. 1985, Winston-Salem, NC) focuses her camera on how African American women are perceived in the corporate world based on their physical appearance.  As a young black woman in a mostly white dominated corporate job, Beal knew people talked behind her back about her hair, which did not conform to their definition of beauty. Now, as a professor at Winston Salem State University, Beal  tackles the stereotypes that her students and other black women face when they do not fit the corporate mold. Am I What You’re Looking For? poses black women in front of a photographic backdrop of a typical office setting, wearing an outfit they find suitable for work. Through this work, Beal challenges the viewer to look at their own biases or sterotypes as they view the photographs.

Medina Dugger (b. 1983, Corpus Christi, TX) pays homage to Nigerian photographer J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere, whose 40 year black and white photographic study of African women’s hairstyles set the standard for the celebration of black hair culture. African hair braiding methods date back thousands of years and Nigerian hair culture is a rich and often extensive process, which begins in childhood. The methods and variations have been influenced by social/cultural patterns, historical events and globalization. Hairdos range from being purely decorative to conveying deeper, more symbolic understandings, revealing social status, age and tribal/family traditions. In her Lagos studio, Dugger pays homage to historical and imagined hairstyles, honoring Ojeikere’s work through a contemporary lens in her series Chroma: An Ode to J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere.

How do you see me? brings together work by three women who dare to question racial stereotypes and biases that are seen in our history books and continue to exist today. Through these important photographs, the artists challenge the perception of beauty, and the different standards that exist based on skin color.

Catherine Edelman will be in conversation with Alanna Airitam, Sheridan Tucker Anderson, Jeffreen Hayes and Kate Lorenz on Thursday, October 18, from 5:30 to 7:30 PM at 300 West Superior Street. A reception in the gallery will follow the panel discussion. More information and a link to RSVP can be found here

The entire exhibition can be seen on our website.