Slowing Down for Slow Art Day

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This Saturday, April 8, is Slow Art Day. Around the world, galleries, museums and other institutions will encourage their visitors to spend more time than average with their collections. It has become common to speed walk through exhibits in search of the highlights, and Slow Art Day was enacted to combat this habit. Fifteen seconds is simply not enough time to digest everything that goes into creating a work of art.

In Texas, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston has outlined a four-step process for art educators that challenged students to look at a piece of art for 30 seconds, turn their backs, and then try to recall and record everything they had seen. When the students return to the artwork, they notice just how much was missing from their lists–what they had overlooked the first time. Both Harvard and MIT now offer courses that lead classes in mindful looking.

We will have five photographs designated for “slow looking,” at which a minimum of ten minutes is recommended for viewing, per piece. At the end of this 50-minute period, gallery staff will be on hand to answer any questions. Discussions have been scheduled for noon and 3 pm.

You don’t need to know a lot about art to approach it. But by simply looking a little longer, you can learn more than you may expect. Discussing your observations with gallery staff and other visitors this Saturday will teach you even more. By thoroughly engaging with the photographs in our gallery, you’ll leave with a better understanding of how the work was made, why, and how it may relate to work by other artists you have seen.

Below are a few articles related to Slow Art Day:
The Art of Slowing Down in a Museum – New York Times
How Long Do You Need to Look at a Work of Art to Get It? – Artsy
Practice Looking at Art – Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

 

Laurent Millet: Somnium opens Friday!

We are delighted to present the first Chicago exhibition for French photographer Laurent Millet, whose photography combines the inquisitiveness of a scientist with the wonder of a child. We will present four different bodies of work that examines his ongoing fascination between the real and the imagined, and our relationship with objects. Somnium opens March 3 and runs through April 29, 2017.

There will be an opening reception on Friday, March 3 from 5:00-7:00 pm.
The artist will be present.

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There is a rich history of artists constructing environments simply to be photographed and then disassembled. These created realities were prevalent in the 1980s, as works by Sandy Skoglund, Bernard Faucon, Bruce Charlesworth, James Welling and other artists burst onto the scene. All of these artists worked with objects to create a narrative, captured by the camera. Laurent Millet (b. 1968 France) continues to work in this tradition, using various 19th c. printing techniques to magnify his vision.

As he stated in a 2014 interview in L’Oeil de la Photographie: “I felt like I had to take refuge in something that was comforting and reassuring… This idea brought me back to what I did as a child in the countryside when I would play with wood and stones. I rediscovered that pleasure as an adult… Starting with the first things I built, fishing machines, I felt like a world was opening up in which I could really exist. These objects are powered by my personal fictions, my dream of another life. The photograph is proof of that, a record of the moment, a reward.”

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For more than twenty years, Laurent Millet has channeled his innate curiosity to create photographs that question the way objects appear within space and time. Citing R. Buckminster Fuller and Denis Diderot among his influences, Millet creates an artistic vocabulary through metal wire, vineyard posts and barrel hoops – objects prevalent in the coastal town of France in which he resides. His 1997 series, Petites Machines Littorales, addressed his surroundings, as he transformed the sea into a place for scientific experimentation, creating contraptions that suggest a way to measure water or listen to fish. These “machines” invite curiosity and questions, much like a child experimenting in a science lab. In his 2000 series Les Cabanes, Millet continues to build structures in the water, yet this time they appear to be bridges, ladders, architectural pieces and fences, suggesting a relationship between water and sky. The 2002 series, La Chasse, features objects that could be used to trap, to capture that which is hard to contain. And finally, in the 2014/15 series, Somnium, the artist photographed himself with geometric objects, polyhedra, that he fabricated. These images seem paranormal yet familiar, as the artist engages with objects hovering in the air, recording his encounter.

His work can be seen in numerous publications including his 2014 book, Les Enfantillages Pittoresques (Filigranes Editions) and in major museum collections, including The Art Institute of Chicago, Maison Européenne de la Photographie (Paris), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and Fonds National d’art Contemporain (Paris), among others.

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Visit CEG’s website to see all the images in the exhibition!

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Breakey and Beltrá Featured at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

Today is the final day of  Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary presented by Art Miami. If you haven’t made it to the fair yet, now is your last chance. We are featuring eight incredible photographers in our booth (140) and today we will highlight two of them.

Seven Finches on Yukka, 2014 - 2105 © Kate Breakey
Seven Finches on Yukka, 2014 – 2105 © Kate Breakey

Kate Breakey (B. 1957 Adelaide, South Australia) is best known for her large-scale photographic work with birds and flowers that she painstakingly brings back to life with colored pencils. These pieces can be seen in two monographs, Small Deaths (2001) and Flowers/Birds (2003). In 2014, Breakey turned her focus to the land, and the small details of everyday life: a hummingbird resting on a tree limb, a wilting tulip, figs on a counter, the moon setting over the mountain, trees swaying in the evening dusk. Produced as Orotones (prints made on glass and backed with 23k gold leaf) Breakey creates small objects that command our attention, using an early technique to comment on the beauty, fragility and simplicity of her daily surroundings.

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Kate Breakey’s work on view at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary
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Daniel Beltrá’s work on view at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

Daniel Beltrá’s Iceland and Greenland work is also on view. Daniel is an aerial and conservation photographer and has been documenting the effects of global warming on our landscape for over two decades.

Iceland 10, 2014 © Daniel Beltrá

To see more work we are exhibiting at the fair, click here.

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

Friday & Saturday: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.

825 S. Dixie Highway at Okeechobee Boulevard in West Palm Beach
For information: Call (800) 376-5850 or visit artpbfair.com

Download a  complimentary pass
for Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary here.

More Artists Featured at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

We are thrilled to be a part of Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary presented by Art Miami. We are featuring eight incredible photographers in our booth (140). Yesterday we highlighted three of them and today we will focus on three more.

Francesco Pergolesi was raised in Spoleto, a small Italian village filled with artisan shops and small businesses. Now splitting his time between Spoleto and Barcelona, Pergolesi creates photographic tableaux inspired by memories from his past: narrow cobblestone streets, the sound of a hammer coming from the open door of a shoemaker; the smell of fresh bread from a baker, the steady beat of a sewing machine from an open window, the smell of old paper in a used bookstore.

Luna, Barcelona, 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi
Luna, Barcelona, 2016 © Francesco Pergolesi

Floriane deLassée has traveled the world showcasing talents of many people who can carry heavy loads upon their heads. Originally from France, Floriane went to some of the world’s most remote landscapes including East Africa, Ethiopia, and Rwanda in search of subjects for her series, How Much Can You Carry ?.

Aru, Ethiopia, 2012 © Floriane de Lassée
Aru, Ethiopia, 2012 © Floriane de Lassée
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Work by Francesco Pergolesi, Floriane de Lassée and Gregory Scott at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

Gregory Scott builds sets in his studio that serve as his subject. In these sets, he records himself performing a variety of scenarios that are then edited into 6-10 minute videos. The sets are then photographed, and the resulting wall piece is a mounted photograph with a cut out for a monitor on which a video plays, and a painted element appears on the photographic surface. All of the hardware is attached to the inside of the frame, making his works self-contained.

Portraits with Mona, 2015 © Gregory Scott

To see more work we are exhibiting at the fair, click here.

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

Friday & Saturday: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.

825 S. Dixie Highway at Okeechobee Boulevard in West Palm Beach
For information: Call (800) 376-5850 or visit artpbfair.com

Download a  complimentary pass
for Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary here.

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Featured Artists

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary opens to the public today and we are thrilled to be a part of this new fair presented by Art Miami. We are featuring eight incredible photographers in our booth (140) and today we will highlight three of them.

Liat Elbling graduated with Honors from the Department of Photography at the Minshar School of Art and has since been working full-time as an artist in Tel Aviv, Israel. A rising star in the fine art photography field, Liat’s work has been shown in numerous exhibitions, among them the Haifa Museum, Ramat Gan Museum, Indie Gallery, Beztalel Academy of Art Gallery and most notably, at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art after receiving the prestigious Leon Constantiner Prize for an Israeli photographer.

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Liat’s work in our booth at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

“My works touch and generate discussions in different disciplines and delve into subjects that preoccupy me: architecture and its components, as well as the notion of “home”, have a predominant presence in my works, at times in its mental and emotional connotations, and other times through the examination of its graphic boundaries, its manifestation in a new space.”

Through, 2015 © Liat Elbling
Through, 2015 © Liat Elbling

Ysabel LeMay found photography after a successful career working as a graphic artist for prominent advertising agencies. Seeking greater fulfillment, she turned to painting, and in 2002, left the corporate world to pursue painting full time. Eight years later, she turned her attention to photography, garnering significant success in a few short years. Combining her technical expertise with her painterly eye, LeMay creates photographs that challenge our perception of the landscape.

Ysabel’s work in our booth at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary
Cosmea, 2016 © Ysabel LeMay
Cosmea, 2016 © Ysabel LeMay

Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison gained recognition for their collaborative works that presented constructed and choreographed scenarios about mans effect on the landscape. More than twenty years later, the artists are still dedicated to the environment, showing us the power of nature, and the effect our actions have on it. By creating environments specifically to photograph, the artists address issues about the earth and our responsibility to heal the damage we’ve created, while investigating the human condition.

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The ParkeHarrison’s work in our booth at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary
First of May, 2015 © Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison
First of May, 2015 © Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison

To see more work we are exhibiting at the fair, click here.

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

Friday & Saturday: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.

825 S. Dixie Highway at Okeechobee Boulevard in West Palm Beach
For information: Call (800) 376-5850 or visit artpbfair.com

Download a  complimentary pass
for Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary here.

 

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Opens Tonight

The By-invitation VIP Preview benefiting the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society is from 5 – 9 p.m. tonight. CEG is very excited to be a part of this new fair presented by Art Miami! Below are some install pictures of our Booth 140.  palmbeach06palmbeach01palmbeach02 palmbeach03  palmbeach07 palmbeach08 palmbeach09

Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary

Friday & Saturday: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.

825 S. Dixie Highway at Okeechobee Boulevard in West Palm Beach
For information: Call (800) 376-5850 or visit artpbfair.com

Download a  complimentary pass
for Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary here.

 

First solo show in USA by Lebanese photographer, Serge Najjar, opens today!

We are excited to present A Closer Look at the Ordinary, the first solo exhibition in the USA by Beirut born photographer Serge Najjar. The show opens January 6 and runs through February 25, 2017.

There will be an opening reception on Friday, January 6 from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
The artist will be present.

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From New York to Beijing, countless strangers dash across city streets in a constant state of frenzy, rushing to their destinations. But every now and then we see someone pause, marveling at his or her surroundings. It is this stillness that Serge Najjar seeks, with one simple guideline, “It is not about what you see but how you see it.”

Five years ago Najjar started photographing the interaction of people and architecture in his native Beirut. Influenced by the work of Kazimir Malevich, Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Stella, and Alexander Rodchenko, Najjar took to the streets, focusing his lens on daily routines: construction workers sitting on a building ledge during lunch break, the sharp lines of a high-rise facade, a man looking out an open window, and children sitting on a windowsill. Whether working in Beirut, Munich or other places he visits, Najjar’s vision is unwavering – to show other people what they may not see themselves. As he states:

“There is no such thing as an ideal place to photograph, or an ideal city. Architecture inspires me, but my whole approach towards photography is to focus on what people consider as common… the people I photograph are complete strangers. I never plan where I go and what or who to shoot. My images are faithful to what I see. And every single Saturday morning I am convinced that I will never capture the picture I had the chance to capture the week before…. It is a thin line between the ugly and the beautiful, the ordinary and the extraordinary, between chaos and order.“

A Closer Look at the Ordinary celebrates the powerful relationship between man and architecture. Through quiet photographs, Serge Najjar creates a dialogue about city living, and the stillness that can exist, if we slow down and focus on the ordinary.

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Visit CEG’s website to see all the images in the exhibition!