Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Nakeya Brown

We are excited to present our newest Ctrl+P artist Nakeya Brown. Photographs from two of her series, Hair Stories Untold and If Nostalgia Were Colored Brown, will be on view through December 30, 2017.

Screen Shot 2017-10-27 at 10.51.40 AM
The Art of Drying, 2014 © Nakeya Brown

 

Nakeya On Hair Politics
“I use photography as a tool to extract and redefine the symbols of femininity. My practice centers itself on black female subjectivity, black beauty, and often uses hair as an apparatus to identify facets of womanhood. I utilize time-specific effects that have racialized, commodified, and cultural relevance in relationship to black women’s bodies and lived experiences. The shower cap, the hot comb, vinyl records depicting images of iconic African-American songstresses, the perm kit, and hair dryers are just a few of the articles I photograph to entwine the materiality of the world with identity formation.”

 

Hair Stories Untold visualizes the unknown methodologies prevalent within to black feminine hair culture. Each photograph reveals a unique form of self-grooming that poses a beautification process which is both fraught and notable in our memory. Such acts of hair manipulation transform the modes in which personhood can be realized. Within it shared experience, remembrance, and material entities reflect a sense of identity.

LovinLivinandGivinv_2016
Lovin’, Livin’ & Givin’, 2014 © Nakeya Brown

If Nostalgia Were Colored Brown utilizes objects associated with home life and beautification processes as building blocks in constructing identity and black feminine spaces of self-care. Each tableaux is a site where memoirs, intimacy, womanhood, culture, and blackness converge in order to cultivate a sense of nostalgia. Iconic imagery of Diana Ross, Minnie Riperton, Stephanie Mills, Deniece Williams, Natalie Cole, LaBelle, and Melba Moore display the commercial potency of black women’s bodies in popular culture.

Nakeya Brown was born in Santa Maria, California in 1988. She received her BA in Visual Arts and Journalism & Media Studies from Rutgers University and her Master of Fine Arts from The George Washington University. Her photography has been exhibited at the McKenna Museum of African American Art, Woman Made Gallery, Hamiltonian Gallery, and The Urban Institute for Contemporary Art. Brown’s work has been featured in New York Mag, Dazed & Confused, The Fader, TIME, and Vice. Her work has been included in photography books Babe and Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze. Brown was awarded the 2017 Snider Prize by the Museum of Contemporary Photography. She currently lives and works in Washington, D.C with her 5 year-old daughter, Mia.

LINKS:

Nakeya’s website
Dazed Digital
The Cut
TIME
The New York Times
The Washington Post
INFRINGE


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Christine Erhard

The photographs by our newest Ctrl+P artist Christine Erhard play with perception. This technique is extended beyond the photographic print and into the spaces where her work is exhibited. DOBRA IV is installed to the artist’s exact specifications, following a building edge in the image. Her installation will be on view through October 28, 2017.

DOBRA4 31 x 51in.jpg
DOBRA IV, 2014 © Christine Erhard

Erhard creates photographic works that evolve out of a sculptural process. The concept for a new photograph begins with a found image, sometimes historical, taken from the field of architecture or art. She layers cardboard models, diverse everyday objects, or constructs objects to be photographed on top of the found image.

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DOBRA IV, installation view

Although the spaces in Erhard’s photographs appear to be extremely heterogeneous and broken, the images are not photomontages in the conventional sense. The photographs bear witness to a sculptural process that takes place in the studio. The disparate materials, lines of sight and levels of reality are in actual, physical contact with each other. Anamorphic models – models that have been constructed for a specific camera viewpoint, appearing distorted when another viewpoint is adopted – are integral to this process.

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Christine Erhard (b. 1969 Crailsheim, Germany) lives in Düsseldorf, Germany. She studied sculpture at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Christine has exhibited widely in both Germany and internationally. Solo shows include The Zweigstelle Gallery in Berlin, Galerie Adler in Frankfurt, the Baden-Württemberg Art Foundation in Stuttgart, the Goethe Institute in Milan, the Museum Muller Collection in Wiesbaden, and the High Street Project gallery in Christchurch, New Zealand.

LINKS:
Christine Erhard’s website
Lens Culture
Yellow Trace

the189
TroikaEditions on Youtube


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an initiative at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, Ctrl+P provides further exposure for new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the Internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended—in print.

The locations that inspired Fabian Schubert

Fabian Schubert’s ongoing series Painters Portraits features artist Hank Schmidt in der Beek painting within landscapes that have significance in art history. Six photographs from this series are currently on view as part of Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline.

Schubert-numbered copy

Each image is titled after a destination known for having been visited by a famous painter.  We asked Fabian: who exactly painted in the locations of these photographs? and we learned some interesting trivia!

1. At the Herzogstand, 2013
Fabian Schubert: “Franz Marc, a member of the Blue Rider Group (“der Blaue Reiter” in German) painted here on the Herzogstand in the Bavarian Alps.”

2. At the Anse De Rospico, 2013
FS: “This one is dedicated to the ‘School of Pont Aven’ around french artist Paul Gauguin in Bretagne, France.”

3. In the Elbe Sandstone Mountains II, 2014
FS: “Caspar David Friedrich shows the Elb Sandstone Mountains in his painting ‘Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer’ which he painted in his studio and not in plein air.”
See this painting online through Hamburger Kunsthalle’s 19th Century collection.

4. At the beach of Etretat, 2013
FS: “Claude Monet painted exactly in this spot viewing the Manneporte in Étretat, France.”
See this painting online through The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

5. In the Zillertaler Alps I, 2009
FS: “This one is the very first of the series and dedicated only to ourselves.”

6. In the Elbe Sandstone Mountains I, 2014
FS: “C.D. Friedrich [as well], Elb Sandstone Mountains in Saxony, Germany.”

Visit the gallery to see Fabian’s work in person through September 4, 2017.
You can also see more of the artist’s work on his website.

Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Fabian Schubert

We are thrilled to feature the work of our new Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist Fabian Schubert. Schubert’s images are on view through September 1, 2017

Hank_Sachs060
In the Elbe Sandstone Mountains I, 2014 © Fabian Schubert

Fabian Schubert (b. 1974 Krefeld, Germany) lives in Berlin and works as a photo and video artist. His work covers an array of techniques and styles ranging from portrait, landscape and still life photography to fictional and documentary videos; herewith developing individual image concepts for an artistic purpose as well as for editorial and commercial use. He studied Photography and History, Japanese history in Berlin.

20160531-hank_innsbruck
In the Zillertaler Alps I, 2009 © Fabian Schubert

Self-Portrait Landscape
The ongoing series Self-Portrait Landscape is collaboration between photographer Fabian Schubert and artist Hank Schmidt in der Beek. It is a conceptual and visual reflection about the picture-in-picture, a painting artist in the picture, a once painted landscape in the picture and a painted pattern of a shirt as a picture. With this series, Schubert and Schmidt in der Beek are seeking out the plein-air locations of Cézanne, C.D. Friedrich, Gauguin, Hockney, Hodler, Kandinsky, Marc, Monet, Münter and others.

20160531-Etretat_1
At the beach of Etretat, 2013 © Fabian Schubert

LINKS:
Fabian’s website
The Guardian
Booooooom.com
Huffington Post

Colossal
It’s Nice That


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Shawn Theodore

We are thrilled to feature the work of our new Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist Shawn Theodore. Theodore’s images are on view through April 29, 2017.

Shawn Theodore is a multidisciplinary Philadelphia-based artist working in photography, video, and collage. His practice embodies a defiant brand of black artistry; one that focuses on the fragmentation and manipulation of African American and African Diaspora identities and otherness, while exploring concepts of race, spirituality, patriarchy, matriarchy and class structure within disappearing Black communities. Theodore attended Tyler School of Art and received his BA in Journalism, Public Relations and Advertising from Temple University.His solo exhibition highlights include: Church of Broken Pieces ’17, African American Museum in Philadelphia; The Avenues ’16, Painted Bride Art Center; The Avenues, G-Town and Uptown ‘14, Imperfect Gallery and Scribe Video Center; The Avenues; North and West Philly, ‘14 and he has exhibited in several group shows.


Makumbusho, 2016

Church of Broken Pieces
Essayist Teju Cole once marveled at the tonal range in the shadows of an image by Roy DeCarava, musing that these darker areas might have been solid, inscrutable black in the hands of another artist. Given the long history of photographic technologies’ inability to register black skin, the artist’s embrace of subtle, modulated darkness was profoundly radical, especially in an age when mainstream representations of African American life were demanded with bombast or stereotype, if they were demanded at all. With DeCarava, Cole writes, “What is dark is neither blank nor empty. It is in fact full of wise light which, with patient seeing, can open out into glories.”[1]

It is no surprise that Philadelphia-based photographer Shawn Theodore cites the iconic Harlem artist among his greatest inspirations. Shooting entirely in the streets, Theodore relishes the many ways that natural light can caress the skin of his Afro-Diasporic subjects, from a flattening glare, to dapples and highlights that dance across the face, to dramatic shadows that all but obfuscate the body. As in the restrained masterworks of DeCarava, however, even the darkest blacks of Theodore’s images give way to nuanced tonalities upon sustained contemplation—for instance, the men and women who turn away from the camera and into the shadows, granting the viewer only the silhouette of their three-quarter profile.

The Contrapasso of the Beloved Stranger, 2016

In Church of Broken Pieces, Theodore presents a new body of photographs made on the streets of Philadelphia’s African American neighborhoods, many of them shrinking thanks to encroaching gentrification. A self-identified street shooter, Theodore has always found his subjects in chance urban encounters; some of these interactions between strangers have evolved into sustained collaborations, the fruits of which are presented here. This constellation of relationships and the community it sustains, however fleeting, are at the core of Theodore’s work.

Complementary to the intimacy and quiet darkness of many of these photographs, a strand of performative exuberance shines through. Our eyes can’t help but linger on the elegantly understated, trans-diasporic fashions in Theodore’s images, often commanding as much attention as the people themselves. Evoking the saturated palette and dynamic surrealism of the great Viviane Sassen, these photographs capture clothing and bodies in motion without sacrificing an ounce of their exquisite composed-ness. The self-possessed subjects enact the language of fashion spreads, history paintings, street performances, and mystical rites, often simultaneously.

Drawn from the name of a church close to the artist’s childhood home, the title’s self-conscious invocation of biblical grandeur calls to mind the great titles of the Harlem Renaissance and the New Negro Movement. Theodore once asked a pastor friend about the origins of the phrase, who told him that “it had to do with the tradition of smaller churches breaking away from the larger ones to continue their service to the community,” he recalls. Like the church and its powerfully simple words, Theodore’s photographs conjure a transhistorical, transnational community mobilizing against erasure. They show us beauty as history, memory, resistance, and a way forward, shining the same wise light of the artist’s forebears and, little by little, opening out into new glories.


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Alexander Khokhlov

We are excited to feature the work of Alexander Khokhlov as the next Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist. Khokhlov’s photographs are on view through February 25, 2017!screen-shot-2017-01-07-at-4-31-56-pm

Weird Beauty and 2D or not 2D series
My first experience with face-art was in 2009, but it wasn’t until 2012 that I had the idea of a whole project – a monochromatic series of portraits which combined graphics, shapes and optical illusions. The Weird Beauty series is a mixture of aesthetic beauty photography with recognizable forms and logos. In 2013, I continued the theme of face transformations inspired by color pop-art posters, the result is 2D or not 2D. The goal of this series was to make the model’s face absolutely “flat” like two-dimensional pictures using only make-up and light.

Alexander Khokhlov was born in Calcutta, India, on May 9, 1982. He is now based in Moscow and works with his wife Veronica. Alexander started photography in 2008 as a commercial studio photographer. His experiments with beauty portraits and art resulted in the acclaimed series Weird Beauty and 2D or not 2D made in 2012 and 2013.

The art-photography that he creates is always based on people transformation. In Alexander’s works the human identity takes a back seat, and the models are used as canvases for well-known shapes to trick your eyes. Each project is a huge team work, a great game with words, imagination and illusions. Of course, it is also a game with the audience.

In 2015 and 2016 Alexander received several awards: 25th Trierenberg Super Circuit (Gold Medal, Weird Beauty series), One Eyeland Photography Awards (Silver Medal, Shapes and Illusions series), Neutral Density Photography Awards 2015 (Bronze Medal, Shapes and Illusions series), International Photography Awards 2015 (Honorable Mention, Shapes and Illusions series).

LINKS:
Alexander Khokhlov’s website
Visual News
Bored Panda
Arch20
Beautiful/Decay
Juxtapoz
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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

Introducing Ctrl+P Artist: Sian Davey

We are thrilled to feature the work of Sian Davey as the next Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist. Four photographs are on view at the gallery from her Looking for Alice series through December 31, 2016.

Winter Virus ii (Alice asleep), Winter, 2014
Winter Virus ii (Alice asleep), Winter, 2014 © Sian Davey

Sian Davey is a photographer with a background in Fine Art and Social Policy. Originally from Brighton in the U.K. Sian is now based in South Devon, in the South West of England. Sian had a private Psychotherapy practice for 15 years, but has recently closed this in order to commit to her photography practice full-time. Her work is an investigation of the psychological landscapes of both herself and those around her. Her family and community are central to her work.

Sian completed her MA in Photography and her MFA (2016) in Photography at Plymouth University. She has been the recipient for numerous awards including more recently winning the Arnold Newman Award for New Directions in Portraiture and for the last three years (2014-2016) has been selected for the Taylor Wessing Portrait Award at the National Gallery in London.

Sian’s first book Looking for Alice (Trolley Books) was published in 2015 and is currently shortlisted for Photobook of the Year at the 2016 Aperture Foundation Awards at Paris Photo 2016.

Garden Gate, Summer, 2014
Garden Gate, Summer, 2014 © Sian Davey

Looking for Alice

Alice is my daughter and I started to photograph her when she was a year old. She was born with Down’s Syndrome, but is no different to any other little girl or indeed human being; she feels what we all feel and needs what you and I need. Similarly, my family is a microcosm for the dynamics occurring in many other families – all the joys, tensions, ups and downs that go with the territory of being in a family.

In my previous work  as a psychotherapist I have listened to many stories and what was revealed to me, during my  fifteen years of practice, is not how different we are to one another, but how alike we are.  The stories vary, but we are all vulnerable to the same feelings of shame, anger, grief, pride and so the list goes on.

Early on in the pregnancy my partner and I were told we had a high probability that we were carrying a baby with Down’s Syndrome. Despite this, I was not prepared for how I would feel after Alice was born and diagnosed. I was deeply shocked, it was not what I had really expected. Our first experiences in hospital did little to diffuse this.

After examining  Alice, the paediatrician  announced that we should ‘take her home and treat her like any other baby’. But she didn’t feel like my other babies. I was fraught with an anxiety that rippled through to every aspect of my relationship with her and, that penetrated my dreams. I dreamt that Alice was swaddled in a blanket and that I had forgotten all about her. In my dream I unwrapped the tight bundle to feed her, only to discover that she was covered in a white fluid – a fluid of neglect; and I was unable to feed her, unable to respond to her basic needs.

Godmother, Summer, 2014 © Sian Davey
Godmother, Summer, 2014 © Sian Davey

I could sense  that Alice was feeling my rejection of her and knew that the responsibility lay with me to work this out and find a way through the fear which as getting in the way of loving her. As my fears dissolved I fell in love with my daughter.

Alice entered a world where routine screening at twelve weeks gestation is entirely weighted towards birth prevention, rather than birth preparation.  Whilst we make our selection and decisions in private, the effect on society is that in the UK, the latest figures (in 2015) tell us that ninety two per cent of Down’s Syndrome babies are terminated at the pre-natal screening stage. Even prior to the introduction of screening, children such as Alice would have been severely marginalized and often institutionalized, with little or limited medical care.

Sitting with a Stranger, 2014
Sitting with a Stranger, 2014 © Sian Davey

Ultimately, this is a story about love and what gets in the way. This concerns all of us, my daughter’s diagnosis is only one aspect of it. The rest is about yours and mine, and indeed society’s relationship with ‘difference’ of all kinds – this is what Alice is inviting us to reflect on.

The process of photographing this work has helped me shine a light on why I struggled to love Alice, which was essentially fear and uncertainty. The project has been very much a co-creation and I have no doubt that Alice has guided to me to what needed to be expressed and understood.

She is now in the middle of everything that we do as a family and is loved unconditionally, as it should be. I can’t help but wonder how it might be for Alice to be always valued everywhere, without distinction, without exception, without a second glance.

This project is for her, for Alice

LINKS:
Sian Davey website
LensCulture
The Guardian
Slate
Aint Bad

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

 

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