Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Kelly Catarino

Catherine Edelman Gallery is pleased to present Kelly Catarino, our current Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist! It was a joy for us to watch this exhibition grow day by day last week. The artist’s photographs and immersive installation will be on view through July 7, 2018.

Installation view
Kelly Catarino (b. 1996, CT) is a photographer currently based in Chicago, IL. Her practice uses collage techniques to explore constructed landscapes, perception, and the space between virtual and physical space. She is pursuing her BFA (2018) at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

From the artist: “Garden is an ongoing series that examines the site of the garden and its relationship to construction, escapism, and the desire to feel connected with nature. I use collage as a strategy for imagining constructed landscapes through its ability to simultaneously collapse time, space, and place. My photographs are multi-dimensional amalgamations that mix personal photographs, stock photography, and fake plants to play with variations in resolution between a multitude of images and image sources. These constructions play on photography’s ability to act as both mirror and mediator by creating a hyper-saturated world that attempts to blur the line between reality and fiction.”

Installation viewInstallation viewOpening reception

LINKS:
Kelly’s website
Hyperallergic


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an initiative at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, Ctrl+P provides further exposure for new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the Internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended—in print.

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Jens Sundheim

We are excited to feature the work of Jens Sundheim as our current Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist! Jens’ work will be on view through February 24, 2018.

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The Traveller
You can watch me. For 15 years now I have been following the traces of public webcams: cameras installed in public or private spheres that automatically record images and spread them via internet. I research where they are located, travel there, and get myself photographed. New York and Moscow, London, Las Vegas and Singapore – I went to more than 650 webcams in 18 countries. So far.

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On location, I place myself in front of the camera. As “The Traveller” I stare back. Same clothes, same pose, every time. You can recognize me in every image. You can watch me. A lot of questions arise. Who sets up these automated cameras, and why? What do they show? Are people aware of them? Who needs these images? Who looks at them? Does the presence of a camera alter a site? What constitutes a photographic image in terms of content, authorship or quality?

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“The Traveller,” installation view of 126 prints and 63:08-minute video on HD monitor.

“The Traveller” examines global spread of imagery between irrelevance, amusement, information and surveillance, and the aesthetics involved. Among many other places, “The Traveller” encountered the legendary coffee machine where the world’s first webcam was pointed, the ESA European Space Agency main control room, a huge cactus observed by four cameras, numerous street corners and backyards, and the inside of a New York police station – arrested for strange behavior.

The Traveller is a collaborative project with Bernhard Reuss.

Jens Sundheim (b. 1970 Germany) studied Information Science, then Photography in Dortmund and Exeter, England. He attended the master course Arno Fischer at Ostkreuzschule Berlin in 2010 and received his MA Photography at HAW Hamburg in 2013. For his work, Sundheim has received several awards including grants by Goethe-Institut Moscow and the European Union, and recently a scholarship for an artist residency in Gotland, Sweden.

Sundheim’s work has been shown at festivals and exhibitions worldwide including The New York Public Library, Rencontres d’Arles Photographie Festival, Triennale der Photographie Hamburg, Fotomuseum Antwerp, Tokyo Museum of Photography, NCCA Moscow and apexart New York. In 2017 and 2018, his works are featured as part of the Japan Media Arts Festival exhibition “Landscapes: New vision through multiple windows” in Singapore, “STARS – Cosmic Art from 1900 up to the Present” at Lentos Art Museum in Linz, Austria, and in a solo exhibition at PhotoIreland Festival in Dublin.

LINKS:

Jens’ Website
Conscientious Photo Magazine
TIME Lightbox
Zone Zero
Mas Context


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an initiative at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, Ctrl+P provides further exposure for new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the Internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended—in print.

Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Nakeya Brown

We are excited to present our newest Ctrl+P artist Nakeya Brown. Photographs from two of her series, Hair Stories Untold and If Nostalgia Were Colored Brown, will be on view through December 30, 2017.

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The Art of Drying, 2014 © Nakeya Brown

 

Nakeya On Hair Politics
“I use photography as a tool to extract and redefine the symbols of femininity. My practice centers itself on black female subjectivity, black beauty, and often uses hair as an apparatus to identify facets of womanhood. I utilize time-specific effects that have racialized, commodified, and cultural relevance in relationship to black women’s bodies and lived experiences. The shower cap, the hot comb, vinyl records depicting images of iconic African-American songstresses, the perm kit, and hair dryers are just a few of the articles I photograph to entwine the materiality of the world with identity formation.”

 

Hair Stories Untold visualizes the unknown methodologies prevalent within to black feminine hair culture. Each photograph reveals a unique form of self-grooming that poses a beautification process which is both fraught and notable in our memory. Such acts of hair manipulation transform the modes in which personhood can be realized. Within it shared experience, remembrance, and material entities reflect a sense of identity.

LovinLivinandGivinv_2016
Lovin’, Livin’ & Givin’, 2014 © Nakeya Brown

If Nostalgia Were Colored Brown utilizes objects associated with home life and beautification processes as building blocks in constructing identity and black feminine spaces of self-care. Each tableaux is a site where memoirs, intimacy, womanhood, culture, and blackness converge in order to cultivate a sense of nostalgia. Iconic imagery of Diana Ross, Minnie Riperton, Stephanie Mills, Deniece Williams, Natalie Cole, LaBelle, and Melba Moore display the commercial potency of black women’s bodies in popular culture.

Nakeya Brown was born in Santa Maria, California in 1988. She received her BA in Visual Arts and Journalism & Media Studies from Rutgers University and her Master of Fine Arts from The George Washington University. Her photography has been exhibited at the McKenna Museum of African American Art, Woman Made Gallery, Hamiltonian Gallery, and The Urban Institute for Contemporary Art. Brown’s work has been featured in New York Mag, Dazed & Confused, The Fader, TIME, and Vice. Her work has been included in photography books Babe and Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze. Brown was awarded the 2017 Snider Prize by the Museum of Contemporary Photography. She currently lives and works in Washington, D.C with her 5 year-old daughter, Mia.

LINKS:

Nakeya’s website
Dazed Digital
The Cut
TIME
The New York Times
The Washington Post
INFRINGE


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Christine Erhard

The photographs by our newest Ctrl+P artist Christine Erhard play with perception. This technique is extended beyond the photographic print and into the spaces where her work is exhibited. DOBRA IV is installed to the artist’s exact specifications, following a building edge in the image. Her installation will be on view through October 28, 2017.

DOBRA4 31 x 51in.jpg
DOBRA IV, 2014 © Christine Erhard

Erhard creates photographic works that evolve out of a sculptural process. The concept for a new photograph begins with a found image, sometimes historical, taken from the field of architecture or art. She layers cardboard models, diverse everyday objects, or constructs objects to be photographed on top of the found image.

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DOBRA IV, installation view

Although the spaces in Erhard’s photographs appear to be extremely heterogeneous and broken, the images are not photomontages in the conventional sense. The photographs bear witness to a sculptural process that takes place in the studio. The disparate materials, lines of sight and levels of reality are in actual, physical contact with each other. Anamorphic models – models that have been constructed for a specific camera viewpoint, appearing distorted when another viewpoint is adopted – are integral to this process.

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Christine Erhard (b. 1969 Crailsheim, Germany) lives in Düsseldorf, Germany. She studied sculpture at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Christine has exhibited widely in both Germany and internationally. Solo shows include The Zweigstelle Gallery in Berlin, Galerie Adler in Frankfurt, the Baden-Württemberg Art Foundation in Stuttgart, the Goethe Institute in Milan, the Museum Muller Collection in Wiesbaden, and the High Street Project gallery in Christchurch, New Zealand.

LINKS:
Christine Erhard’s website
Lens Culture
Yellow Trace

the189
TroikaEditions on Youtube


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an initiative at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, Ctrl+P provides further exposure for new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the Internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended—in print.

The locations that inspired Fabian Schubert

Fabian Schubert’s ongoing series Painters Portraits features artist Hank Schmidt in der Beek painting within landscapes that have significance in art history. Six photographs from this series are currently on view as part of Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline.

Schubert-numbered copy

Each image is titled after a destination known for having been visited by a famous painter.  We asked Fabian: who exactly painted in the locations of these photographs? and we learned some interesting trivia!

1. At the Herzogstand, 2013
Fabian Schubert: “Franz Marc, a member of the Blue Rider Group (“der Blaue Reiter” in German) painted here on the Herzogstand in the Bavarian Alps.”

2. At the Anse De Rospico, 2013
FS: “This one is dedicated to the ‘School of Pont Aven’ around french artist Paul Gauguin in Bretagne, France.”

3. In the Elbe Sandstone Mountains II, 2014
FS: “Caspar David Friedrich shows the Elb Sandstone Mountains in his painting ‘Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer’ which he painted in his studio and not in plein air.”
See this painting online through Hamburger Kunsthalle’s 19th Century collection.

4. At the beach of Etretat, 2013
FS: “Claude Monet painted exactly in this spot viewing the Manneporte in Étretat, France.”
See this painting online through The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

5. In the Zillertaler Alps I, 2009
FS: “This one is the very first of the series and dedicated only to ourselves.”

6. In the Elbe Sandstone Mountains I, 2014
FS: “C.D. Friedrich [as well], Elb Sandstone Mountains in Saxony, Germany.”

Visit the gallery to see Fabian’s work in person through September 4, 2017.
You can also see more of the artist’s work on his website.

Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Fabian Schubert

We are thrilled to feature the work of our new Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist Fabian Schubert. Schubert’s images are on view through September 1, 2017

Hank_Sachs060
In the Elbe Sandstone Mountains I, 2014 © Fabian Schubert

Fabian Schubert (b. 1974 Krefeld, Germany) lives in Berlin and works as a photo and video artist. His work covers an array of techniques and styles ranging from portrait, landscape and still life photography to fictional and documentary videos; herewith developing individual image concepts for an artistic purpose as well as for editorial and commercial use. He studied Photography and History, Japanese history in Berlin.

20160531-hank_innsbruck
In the Zillertaler Alps I, 2009 © Fabian Schubert

Self-Portrait Landscape
The ongoing series Self-Portrait Landscape is collaboration between photographer Fabian Schubert and artist Hank Schmidt in der Beek. It is a conceptual and visual reflection about the picture-in-picture, a painting artist in the picture, a once painted landscape in the picture and a painted pattern of a shirt as a picture. With this series, Schubert and Schmidt in der Beek are seeking out the plein-air locations of Cézanne, C.D. Friedrich, Gauguin, Hockney, Hodler, Kandinsky, Marc, Monet, Münter and others.

20160531-Etretat_1
At the beach of Etretat, 2013 © Fabian Schubert

LINKS:
Fabian’s website
The Guardian
Booooooom.com
Huffington Post

Colossal
It’s Nice That


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

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Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Shawn Theodore

We are thrilled to feature the work of our new Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist Shawn Theodore. Theodore’s images are on view through April 29, 2017.

Shawn Theodore is a multidisciplinary Philadelphia-based artist working in photography, video, and collage. His practice embodies a defiant brand of black artistry; one that focuses on the fragmentation and manipulation of African American and African Diaspora identities and otherness, while exploring concepts of race, spirituality, patriarchy, matriarchy and class structure within disappearing Black communities. Theodore attended Tyler School of Art and received his BA in Journalism, Public Relations and Advertising from Temple University.His solo exhibition highlights include: Church of Broken Pieces ’17, African American Museum in Philadelphia; The Avenues ’16, Painted Bride Art Center; The Avenues, G-Town and Uptown ‘14, Imperfect Gallery and Scribe Video Center; The Avenues; North and West Philly, ‘14 and he has exhibited in several group shows.


Makumbusho, 2016

Church of Broken Pieces
Essayist Teju Cole once marveled at the tonal range in the shadows of an image by Roy DeCarava, musing that these darker areas might have been solid, inscrutable black in the hands of another artist. Given the long history of photographic technologies’ inability to register black skin, the artist’s embrace of subtle, modulated darkness was profoundly radical, especially in an age when mainstream representations of African American life were demanded with bombast or stereotype, if they were demanded at all. With DeCarava, Cole writes, “What is dark is neither blank nor empty. It is in fact full of wise light which, with patient seeing, can open out into glories.”[1]

It is no surprise that Philadelphia-based photographer Shawn Theodore cites the iconic Harlem artist among his greatest inspirations. Shooting entirely in the streets, Theodore relishes the many ways that natural light can caress the skin of his Afro-Diasporic subjects, from a flattening glare, to dapples and highlights that dance across the face, to dramatic shadows that all but obfuscate the body. As in the restrained masterworks of DeCarava, however, even the darkest blacks of Theodore’s images give way to nuanced tonalities upon sustained contemplation—for instance, the men and women who turn away from the camera and into the shadows, granting the viewer only the silhouette of their three-quarter profile.

The Contrapasso of the Beloved Stranger, 2016

In Church of Broken Pieces, Theodore presents a new body of photographs made on the streets of Philadelphia’s African American neighborhoods, many of them shrinking thanks to encroaching gentrification. A self-identified street shooter, Theodore has always found his subjects in chance urban encounters; some of these interactions between strangers have evolved into sustained collaborations, the fruits of which are presented here. This constellation of relationships and the community it sustains, however fleeting, are at the core of Theodore’s work.

Complementary to the intimacy and quiet darkness of many of these photographs, a strand of performative exuberance shines through. Our eyes can’t help but linger on the elegantly understated, trans-diasporic fashions in Theodore’s images, often commanding as much attention as the people themselves. Evoking the saturated palette and dynamic surrealism of the great Viviane Sassen, these photographs capture clothing and bodies in motion without sacrificing an ounce of their exquisite composed-ness. The self-possessed subjects enact the language of fashion spreads, history paintings, street performances, and mystical rites, often simultaneously.

Drawn from the name of a church close to the artist’s childhood home, the title’s self-conscious invocation of biblical grandeur calls to mind the great titles of the Harlem Renaissance and the New Negro Movement. Theodore once asked a pastor friend about the origins of the phrase, who told him that “it had to do with the tradition of smaller churches breaking away from the larger ones to continue their service to the community,” he recalls. Like the church and its powerfully simple words, Theodore’s photographs conjure a transhistorical, transnational community mobilizing against erasure. They show us beauty as history, memory, resistance, and a way forward, shining the same wise light of the artist’s forebears and, little by little, opening out into new glories.


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an exciting venture at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, CEG introduces Chicagoans to new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended — in print.

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