Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline – Kelly Catarino

Catherine Edelman Gallery is pleased to present Kelly Catarino, our current Ctrl+P: Photography Taken Offline artist! It was a joy for us to watch this exhibition grow day by day last week. The artist’s photographs and immersive installation will be on view through July 7, 2018.

Installation view
Kelly Catarino (b. 1996, CT) is a photographer currently based in Chicago, IL. Her practice uses collage techniques to explore constructed landscapes, perception, and the space between virtual and physical space. She is pursuing her BFA (2018) at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

From the artist: “Garden is an ongoing series that examines the site of the garden and its relationship to construction, escapism, and the desire to feel connected with nature. I use collage as a strategy for imagining constructed landscapes through its ability to simultaneously collapse time, space, and place. My photographs are multi-dimensional amalgamations that mix personal photographs, stock photography, and fake plants to play with variations in resolution between a multitude of images and image sources. These constructions play on photography’s ability to act as both mirror and mediator by creating a hyper-saturated world that attempts to blur the line between reality and fiction.”

Installation viewInstallation viewOpening reception

LINKS:
Kelly’s website
Hyperallergic


Ctrl+P: Photography taken offline is an initiative at Catherine Edelman Gallery inspired by the hundreds of photographs we see on blogs and online galleries. Started in January 2011, Ctrl+P provides further exposure for new artists we find while searching the web, exhibiting a small selection of one person’s work every two months, taking the pictures offline and putting them on the wall. It is our goal that Ctrl+P will provide further exposure for these photographers away from the glow of a computer monitor and without the temptation to click to the next link. We hope you will join us by unplugging from the Internet and visiting CEG to see these photographs the way they were intended—in print.

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